Peter Sagal has a motorcycle with “We the People” painted on it. Everyone at the National Archives is jealous.
Why did we have two sightings of Peter Sagal yesterday? The host of the radio program “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me” was stopping by the home of the Constitution to film some segments for his upcoming program "CONSTITUTION USA with Peter Sagal."
After shooting in front of the Constitution in the dim light of the Rotunda, he came back in the afternoon so his film crew could shoot some sunny footage of him on this Constitution-themed hog outside the National Archives.

Peter Sagal has a motorcycle with “We the People” painted on it. Everyone at the National Archives is jealous.

Why did we have two sightings of Peter Sagal yesterday? The host of the radio program “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me” was stopping by the home of the Constitution to film some segments for his upcoming program "CONSTITUTION USA with Peter Sagal."

After shooting in front of the Constitution in the dim light of the Rotunda, he came back in the afternoon so his film crew could shoot some sunny footage of him on this Constitution-themed hog outside the National Archives.

By the second week of September, the delegates to the Constitutional Convention had hammered out nearly all of the details of new government. They had carefully recorded each article they adopted throughout the summer, but they had not focused much energy on making them presentable as a whole.
Aware that they would soon lift their self-imposed veil of secrecy and present the finished document to the rest of the nation, they referred the entire document to the Committee on Style.  The Committee of Style was charged with organizing the articles and polishing the language to impart the Constitution with a consistent voice commensurate with its status as the foundation of the United States government.
The five delegates selected to serve on Committee of Style were William Samuel Johnson, Alexander Hamilton, Gouverneur Morris, James Madison, and Rufus King.
Perhaps the most iconic edit proposed by the Committee of Style appears in the first line of the Preamble to the Constitution. While earlier drafts listed each state individually, the Preamble presented to the Convention on September 12 began “We the People of the United States.”

By the second week of September, the delegates to the Constitutional Convention had hammered out nearly all of the details of new government. They had carefully recorded each article they adopted throughout the summer, but they had not focused much energy on making them presentable as a whole.

Aware that they would soon lift their self-imposed veil of secrecy and present the finished document to the rest of the nation, they referred the entire document to the Committee on Style.  The Committee of Style was charged with organizing the articles and polishing the language to impart the Constitution with a consistent voice commensurate with its status as the foundation of the United States government.

The five delegates selected to serve on Committee of Style were William Samuel Johnson, Alexander Hamilton, Gouverneur Morris, James Madison, and Rufus King.

Perhaps the most iconic edit proposed by the Committee of Style appears in the first line of the Preamble to the Constitution. While earlier drafts listed each state individually, the Preamble presented to the Convention on September 12 began “We the People of the United States.”