Join archivist Claire Kluskens for a genealogy lecture on “Artificial Limbs for Union Civil War Veterans, 1861-1927” Kluskens will discuss records created to help Civil War veterans obtain artificial limbs (all skill levels welcome). 
Saturday, March 15, at 10 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 
Image: Photograph of Union and Confederate Veterans Shaking Hands Across the Stone Wall at the 1938 “Blue and Gray Reunion” at Gettysburg, 1938 National Archives Identifier 4529731.  

Join archivist Claire Kluskens for a genealogy lecture on “Artificial Limbs for Union Civil War Veterans, 1861-1927” Kluskens will discuss records created to help Civil War veterans obtain artificial limbs (all skill levels welcome). 

Saturday, March 15, at 10 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 

Image: Photograph of Union and Confederate Veterans Shaking Hands Across the Stone Wall at the 1938 “Blue and Gray Reunion” at Gettysburg, 1938 National Archives Identifier 4529731.  

The real Monuments Men (and Women) worked to protect Europe’s cultural heritage during World War II. Learn more about them in a Twitter chat on Tuesday, March 11, at 2:30 p.m. ET hosted by the National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the National Archives. 
Get your questions ready and join us on Twitter by following the hashtag #MonMenChat. RSVP here: http://on.fb.me/1kvRWTH

The real Monuments Men (and Women) worked to protect Europe’s cultural heritage during World War II. Learn more about them in a Twitter chat on Tuesday, March 11, at 2:30 p.m. ET hosted by the National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the National Archives.

Get your questions ready and join us on Twitter by following the hashtag #MonMenChat. RSVP here: http://on.fb.me/1kvRWTH

Sometimes our archivists look for one document and find a little something extra! When archivist Alan Walker tried to track down a photograph of a 90mm antiaircraft gun for a World War II veteran, he couldn’t find one.

"I spent half the day trying to track down a decent shot of the antiaircraft gun Mr. Evans requested, and I came up empty. Then I read through his letter again. He and his gun crew set a record for downing 12 Japanese bombers over Rendova? Maybe they had been photographed after their feat; the military services are always on the lookout for a good story to tell the folks back home.

So I checked out series 127-GW, under the heading Rendova … and what do you know?”

There was the gun, and Mr. Evans, aged 22!

Mr. Evans was on the far left, behind the gun, and next to him were P Pvt. Roy E. Boone and Pfc. John S.Gembarowski.

Read the original request letter and the full story here: http://go.usa.gov/BByx


If you happen to be traveling through St. Louis this week by way of the Lambert International Airpot, be sure to check out a pair of display cases at Terminal One near the baggage claim area.
The National Archives at St. Louis has installed an exhibit that invites travelers to learn more about genealogy research, as well as how to use social media to learn more about our holdings and services. The exhibit comes down on January 10, so don’t miss your chance to see it!
One display case features such famous veterans as Ira Hayes, recent Medal of Honor recipient Father Emil Kapaun, actress Beatrice Arthur, and jazz musician John Coltrane. 
The display also offers a glimpse into the records and the meticulous work of St. Louis’ Preservation Programs. The second case features scenes from the Preservation Lab showing work to preserve Official Military Personnel Files impacted by the 1973 fire. 
Note: the airport charges parking fees to all visitors.

If you happen to be traveling through St. Louis this week by way of the Lambert International Airpot, be sure to check out a pair of display cases at Terminal One near the baggage claim area.

The National Archives at St. Louis has installed an exhibit that invites travelers to learn more about genealogy research, as well as how to use social media to learn more about our holdings and services. The exhibit comes down on January 10, so don’t miss your chance to see it!

One display case features such famous veterans as Ira Hayes, recent Medal of Honor recipient Father Emil Kapaun, actress Beatrice Arthur, and jazz musician John Coltrane. 

The display also offers a glimpse into the records and the meticulous work of St. Louis’ Preservation Programs. The second case features scenes from the Preservation Lab showing work to preserve Official Military Personnel Files impacted by the 1973 fire. 

Note: the airport charges parking fees to all visitors.

Emmy award–winning journalist and executive producer Regina Griffin presents her  documentary, Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story, at a free screening Tuesday, January 7, at noon at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. 
 The film presents the story of the unwanted, ignored, and forgotten children born to German women and African-American soldiers after World War II. 
 Presented in partnsership with the National Archives’ Afro-American History Society. (102 minutes.)

Emmy award–winning journalist and executive producer Regina Griffin presents her  documentary, Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story, at a free screening Tuesday, January 7, at noon at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. 

 The film presents the story of the unwanted, ignored, and forgotten children born to German women and African-American soldiers after World War II.

 Presented in partnsership with the National Archives’ Afro-American History Society. (102 minutes.)

In the Research Room of the National Archives, reporter Michael Phillips peers into the box of records that sparked the series “The Lobotomy Files,”which is being published this week in the Wall Street Journal.
"The Lobotomy Files" is an in-depth investigation into a forgotten episode in history. Using National Archives records,  Phillips untangled the story of once-healthy young Americans who went to war, came back mentally ill, and were never the same after receiving this drastic treatment from the VA.

In the Research Room of the National Archives, reporter Michael Phillips peers into the box of records that sparked the series “The Lobotomy Files,”which is being published this week in the Wall Street Journal.

"The Lobotomy Files" is an in-depth investigation into a forgotten episode in history. Using National Archives records,  Phillips untangled the story of once-healthy young Americans who went to war, came back mentally ill, and were never the same after receiving this drastic treatment from the VA.

Yesterday we celebrated our veterans. But during World War II, one million African American men and the thousands of African American women were serving their country in racially segregated units.

In 1948, President Truman changed that by signing this landmark document.

This Executive Order called for equality of treatment and opportunity in the armed forces of the United States. Do you think it should be the first document to go display in our new “Records of Rights” exhibit? http://go.usa.gov/Djrh

Many years later, General Colin Powell would credit Truman for this move towards equality and civil rights:
“The military was the only institution in all of America—because of Harry Truman—where a young black kid, now twenty-one years old, could dream the dream he dared not think about at age eleven. It was the one place where the only thing that counted was courage, where the color of your guts and the color of your blood was more important than the color of your skin.”

Cast your vote for Executive Order 9981 to be displayed first in the new “Records of Rights” gallery. http://go.usa.gov/Djrh

With the National Archives at Denver closed on Monday in observance of Veterans Day, we here would like to wish all of our nation’s service members, both past and present, an early happy Veterans Day! It can be very stressful just having one family member serve in the military overseas, but during World War II, Andrew and Cecilia Schildt of rural Glacier County, Montana, had twice the worry when two of their three boys shipped out. 
Joseph and Harry Schildt, seen in this photograph from our Bureau of Indian Affairs Blackfeet holdings, both joined the Army in November 1943. 
But despite Harry being wounded in the Pacific theater (he earned the Purple Heart medal for his injury), both boys returned home safe following the war.Image: RG 75 Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, accession 8NS-75-96-133 “Decimal Correspondence Files, 1913-57,” Box 63, ARC identifier 7329402

With the National Archives at Denver closed on Monday in observance of Veterans Day, we here would like to wish all of our nation’s service members, both past and present, an early happy Veterans Day!

It can be very stressful just having one family member serve in the military overseas, but during World War II, Andrew and Cecilia Schildt of rural Glacier County, Montana, had twice the worry when two of their three boys shipped out.

Joseph and Harry Schildt, seen in this photograph from our Bureau of Indian Affairs Blackfeet holdings, both joined the Army in November 1943.

But despite Harry being wounded in the Pacific theater (he earned the Purple Heart medal for his injury), both boys returned home safe following the war.

Image: RG 75 Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, accession 8NS-75-96-133 “Decimal Correspondence Files, 1913-57,” Box 63, ARC identifier 7329402

Maj. George Eyster V served with J-PAC, an elite division whose sole mission is to bring all fallen soldiers home to the country for which they gave their lives. 
Author Bryan Bender speaks on Wednesday, November 6, at noon about Eyster’s mission to recover the remains of Capt. Ryan McCowna, a pilot shot down over New Guinea in 1944. 
Join us in person on watch on our Ustream channel.
A book signing will follow the program.

Maj. George Eyster V served with J-PAC, an elite division whose sole mission is to bring all fallen soldiers home to the country for which they gave their lives.

Author Bryan Bender speaks on Wednesday, November 6, at noon about Eyster’s mission to recover the remains of Capt. Ryan McCowna, a pilot shot down over New Guinea in 1944.

Join us in person on watch on our Ustream channel.

A book signing will follow the program.

On the final day of American Archives month, we wanted to introduce Bernie Gardner, the longest-serving employee at the National Archives. He’s worked here since 1967. (In fact, he started working for the Federal government in 1955.)
Bernie is the expert on veterans files held in the Washington National Records Center, our facility in Suitland, MD.These records include various Department of Defense overseas collections, the records of the Selective Service System, and the Department of Veterans Affairs files of deceased veterans.
The records there are not permanent—they are stored for other agencies and sent out if requested.
Records managers in the DC area call Bernie when they need their records and have a minimum of location information. They know Bernie will do everything possible to get them the files they need as quickly as possible.
Thank you for your service, Bernie!

On the final day of American Archives month, we wanted to introduce Bernie Gardner, the longest-serving employee at the National Archives. He’s worked here since 1967. (In fact, he started working for the Federal government in 1955.)

Bernie is the expert on veterans files held in the Washington National Records Center, our facility in Suitland, MD.These records include various Department of Defense overseas collections, the records of the Selective Service System, and the Department of Veterans Affairs files of deceased veterans.

The records there are not permanent—they are stored for other agencies and sent out if requested.

Records managers in the DC area call Bernie when they need their records and have a minimum of location information. They know Bernie will do everything possible to get them the files they need as quickly as possible.

Thank you for your service, Bernie!