Constitution Day Family Activities
Celebrate the 227th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution by writing with quill pens, dressing up, craft activities, and more!This program is supported in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generosity of John Hancock.
Wednesday, September 17, 1-4 p.m. in the Boeing Learning Center
Photograph by Jeff Reed. 

Constitution Day Family Activities

Celebrate the 227th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution by writing with quill pens, dressing up, craft activities, and more!
This program is supported in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generosity of John Hancock.

Wednesday, September 17, 1-4 p.m. in the Boeing Learning Center

Photograph by Jeff Reed. 

Although the National Archives Building was nearly completed in 1935, the Rotunda sat empty. The Constitution and the Declaration of Independence were still at the Library of Congress.

Then, on December 13, 1952, an armored Marine Corps personnel carrier made its way down Constitution Avenue, accompanied by two light tanks, four servicemen carrying submachine guns, and a motorcycle escort. A color guard, ceremonial troops, the Army Band, and the Air Force Drum and Bugle Corps were also part of the procession. Members of all the military branches lined the street.

Inside the personnel carrier were six parchment documents. The records were in helium-filled glass cases packed inside wooden crates resting on mattresses.

The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were finally going to the National Archives.

Read the full story on the Prologue blog.

Happy Constitution Day! The Constitution is 226 years old, and is the oldest written constitution still in use today. It is on permanent display at the National Archives in Washington, DC. You can see a high-res image and read a transcript of the Constitution here: http://go.usa.gov/D5VRTop Five Facts about the Constitution!Five: The Constitution has 4,543 words, including the signatures. It takes about 30 minutes to read.Four: Two of the first 12 amendments submitted were rejected; the remaining ten became the Bill of Rights.Three: The Chief Justice is mentioned in the Constitution, but the number of Justices is not specified.Two: Only one amendment to the Constitution has been repealed: the 18th (Prohibition).One: The Constitution does not give us our rights and liberties, but it does guarantee them. For more Constitution myth busting, read today’s blog post: http://go.usa.gov/D5kJ

Happy Constitution Day! The Constitution is 226 years old, and is the oldest written constitution still in use today. It is on permanent display at the National Archives in Washington, DC. You can see a high-res image and read a transcript of the Constitution here: http://go.usa.gov/D5VR

Top Five Facts about the Constitution!

Five: The Constitution has 4,543 words, including the signatures. It takes about 30 minutes to read.

Four: Two of the first 12 amendments submitted were rejected; the remaining ten became the Bill of Rights.

Three: The Chief Justice is mentioned in the Constitution, but the number of Justices is not specified.

Two: Only one amendment to the Constitution has been repealed: the 18th (Prohibition).

One: The Constitution does not give us our rights and liberties, but it does guarantee them.

For more Constitution myth busting, read today’s blog post: http://go.usa.gov/D5kJ

What were the Constitution’s framers really thinking?
Join us on Thursday, September 19, at noon as David Robertson unravels the highly political dynamics that shaped the document that politicians continue to debate today.
A book signing follows the program. Enter through the Special Entrance on Constitution Avenue.
Can’t make it to the program? Watch live on our Ustream channel!

What were the Constitution’s framers really thinking?

Join us on Thursday, September 19, at noon as David Robertson unravels the highly political dynamics that shaped the document that politicians continue to debate today.

A book signing follows the program. Enter through the Special Entrance on Constitution Avenue.

Can’t make it to the program? Watch live on our Ustream channel!

Teach your child about the Constitution on September 17!
Join us for Constitution Day activities in the Boeing Learning Center at the National Archives in Washington, DC.
Draft your own amendment to the Constitution
Play games and learn more about the Framers
Design your own American flag
Discover the rules for adding more states to the Union
Write with a quill pen, just like they did in 1789
Activities are free and open to all visitors from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Teach your child about the Constitution on September 17!

Join us for Constitution Day activities in the Boeing Learning Center at the National Archives in Washington, DC.

  • Draft your own amendment to the Constitution
  • Play games and learn more about the Framers
  • Design your own American flag
  • Discover the rules for adding more states to the Union
  • Write with a quill pen, just like they did in 1789

Activities are free and open to all visitors from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

See page 5 (describing the executive’s powers) of George Washington’s personal draft of the Constitution, now on display at Mount Vernon. Next to this document you can see Washington’s personal copy of the book “Acts of Congress,” recently acquired by the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association.
Washington’s handwritten notes in pencil can be seen scribbled in the margins. Washington received the book in 1789, his first year in office as U.S. president, and brought it with him to Mount Vernon upon his retirement in 1797. Only three are known to exist today, the Washington copy and copies originally owned by Thomas Jefferson and John Jay. Washington’s copy of the draft Constitution is from the National Archives and will be on view through October. The Acts of Congress can be seen through February 22, 2013. Shown together for the first time, the two documents “offer an unprecedented view of history in the making, through the mind and actions of America’s first president.” For more about Washington and these documents, read this blog post: http://go.usa.gov/rAFA For more about Mount Vernon and the exhibit, go here: http://www.mountvernon.org/ Image courtesy of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association.

See page 5 (describing the executive’s powers) of George Washington’s personal draft of the Constitution, now on display at Mount Vernon. Next to this document you can see Washington’s personal copy of the book “Acts of Congress,” recently acquired by the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association.

Washington’s handwritten notes in pencil can be seen scribbled in the margins. Washington received the book in 1789, his first year in office as U.S. president, and brought it with him to Mount Vernon upon his retirement in 1797. Only three are known to exist today, the Washington copy and copies originally owned by Thomas Jefferson and John Jay.

Washington’s copy of the draft Constitution is from the National Archives and will be on view through October. The Acts of Congress can be seen through February 22, 2013. Shown together for the first time, the two documents “offer an unprecedented view of history in the making, through the mind and actions of America’s first president.”

For more about Washington and these documents, read this blog post: http://go.usa.gov/rAFA

For more about Mount Vernon and the exhibit, go here: http://www.mountvernon.org/

Image courtesy of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association.

Constitution 225: Tweet the Preamble Challenge Results!

In honor of the 225th anniversary of the Constitution, we challenged citizens on Twitter to capture the essence of the 52-word Preamble in just 140 characters. Here’s the winner and some of our favorite entries!

The Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero chose the winner of the “Tweet the Preamble” challenge!:

@JeanHuets: #preamble We’re getting together to constitute a nation that’s just, peaceful, strong, prosperous and free. Are you in?
A “family portrait” of 225 new American citizens! They had just completed being sworn in front of the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights in the Rotunda of the National Archives Building.
To honor the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution, 225 petitioners from around the world became U.S. citizens in our annual naturalization ceremony.  This year’s ceremony featured remarks from Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero and a keynote address by United States Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano. The Honorable Royce Lamberth, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, presided over the ceremony.

A “family portrait” of 225 new American citizens! They had just completed being sworn in front of the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights in the Rotunda of the National Archives Building.

To honor the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution, 225 petitioners from around the world became U.S. citizens in our annual naturalization ceremony.

This year’s ceremony featured remarks from Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero and a keynote address by United States Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano. The Honorable Royce Lamberth, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, presided over the ceremony.