We had a great time at #ArchivesSleepover on Saturday. Our guests came from states up and down the East Coast and as far away as Michigan as well from the DC area.

The theme was “History, Heroes, and Treasure” and our archival explorers met an underwater archeologist from the National Park Service who is exploring the shipwreck of the “America” as well as representatives from the Navy History and Heritage Center.

They learned about mapping underwater shipwrecks and tried on tools used by underwater archeologists, as well as artifacts found in shipwrecks. They even had the chance to dress up as underwater archeologists!

They also had a chance to question famous explorers Meriwether Lewis and Matthew Henson as well as an archeologist during “Archives Reports.”

After a good night’s sleep on the marble floor of the Rotunda, they woke up to pancakes flipped and served by David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, and hot chocolate served by American Heritage Chocolate.

Want to join the fun? Sign up here to be the first to hear about the next #ArchivesSleepover: http://www.archivesfoundation.org/sleepover/

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The Wonder Sponge: And We are Not Talking about SpongeBob SquarePants

A popular tool in our St. Louis Paper Lab for cleaning mold from records is our foamed natural rubber sponge erasers. Every work station has a pile of them! These soft erasers do wonders in cleaning mold from the paper’s surface. The erasers come in “brick” sizes and are easily trimmed down into smaller pieces which are held more easily in your hand. But an important word of caution! Although softer than hard erasers these can still be abrasive, and can cause damage if used on paper surfaces that are soft and friable due to more extensive damage.

Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra in Concert

Celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival, the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra Ensemble will feature songs performed by composers and musician ambassadors who presented American jazz to international audiences. 

Thursday, June 26 at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution).

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

In celebration of the 80th anniversary of the establishment of the National Archives, we present a selection of archival films including Your National Archives (195 minutes) and The Washington Parade: The Archives. (70 minutes.)
Tuesday, June 24 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution).
Image: View of the construction of the National Archives Building, November 2, 1933. Records of the Public Building Service, National Archives, Washington, DC. 

In celebration of the 80th anniversary of the establishment of the National Archives, we present a selection of archival films including Your National Archives (195 minutes) and The Washington Parade: The Archives. (70 minutes.)

Tuesday, June 24 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution).

Image: View of the construction of the National Archives Building, November 2, 1933. Records of the Public Building Service, National Archives, Washington, DC. 

Family historians, please join us next week for “National Archives Records on Ancestry.com” with Chad Milliner of Ancestry.com. Tuesday, June 24, from 11 a.m. to noon in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance).
Repeated on Thursday, June 26, from 11 a.m. to noon at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room C. 
Topics covered include:• How Ancestry works with the National Archives• Long term projects underway•  Collections added recently•  Hidden Gems•  Sneak Peek of “Coming Attractions”

Family historians, please join us next week for “National Archives Records on Ancestry.com” with Chad Milliner of Ancestry.com.
 
Tuesday, June 24, from 11 a.m. to noon in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance).

Repeated on Thursday, June 26, from 11 a.m. to noon at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room C. 

Topics covered include:
• How Ancestry works with the National Archives
• Long term projects underway
  Collections added recently
  Hidden Gems
  Sneak Peek of “Coming Attractions”

To celebrate the 80th anniversary of the creation of the National Archives, staff from around the country submitted contemporary photographs of their workplace and people to show what we look like in 2014 for anyone interested now and in the future. 

You can see more photos of staff at the photo set on Flickr

Images from top:

Mickey Ebert, Education Specialist; and Chris Magee, Archivist; practice “NARA and National Symbols,” a distance learning puppet show for kindergarteners with Hairy History and War Eagle, puppet  at the Interactive Distance Learning Lab at the National Archives at Kansas City. Photographer: Jessica Hopkins. Source: US National Archives and Records Administration.

Audrey Amidon showing a close-up of acetate film in an advanced state of vinegar syndrome in the Motion Picture Preservation Lab at the National Archives at College Park. The film base has shrunk more than the emulsion causing the wrinkly surface you see here. Photographer: Richard Schneider. Source: US National Archives and Records Administration.

Brad Brooks, Brian Swidal, Laurice Clark, and Amy Bunk hanging up the seal of the National Archives at the Office of the Federal Registrar. Photographer: Jim Hemphil. Source: US National Archives and Records Administration.

Devon McKeown cleaning archival records at the National Archives at Chicago. Photographer: Mary Ann Zulevic. Source: US National Archives and Records Administration.

Ancestry.com contractor digitizes Los Angeles Naturalization Petitions at the National Archives at Riverside. Photographer: Joseph S. Peñaranda. Source: US National Archives and Records Administration.

This morning, the National Archives hosted a special naturalization ceremony in the Rotunda. Fifty new citizens were sworn from 44 countries, including Afghanistan, Algeria, Bolivia, and Zimbabwe. 

Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero gave opening remarks. During the ceremony Ms. Lori Scialabba, the Acting Director of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services; the Honorable Jeh Charles Johnson, Secretary of Homeland Security; and First Lady Michelle Obama all gave remarks. 

Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns
Join us for Episode Five: Swing: Pure Pleasure. In the mid-1930s, jazz has a new name—swing—and for the first time musicians become matinee idols. (90 minutes.) 
Friday, June 20 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns

Join us for Episode Five: Swing: Pure Pleasure. In the mid-1930s, jazz has a new name—swing—and for the first time musicians become matinee idols. (90 minutes.) 

Friday, June 20 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Jazz on a Summer’s Day

In 1958, photographer Bert Stern produced and directed this chronicle of the Newport Jazz Festival. Featuring performances by Louis Armstrong, Anita O’Day, Mahalia Jackson, and Thelonious Monk, the film is filled with illuminating images of late 1950s America. (84 minutes.) George Wein, founder of the Newport Jazz Festival, will introduce the screening. 

Thursday, June 19, at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

The Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR), the so-called “Hitler Albums” document the unprecedented and systematic looting of European art by the Nazis, a story recently brought to the screen by George Clooney in The Monuments Men film. The ERR was the main Nazi agency engaged in art looting in Nazi-occupied countries. As the ERR looted, photographed, and catalogued French collections, they created albums, including the one being donated. Each page of the album shows a photograph of one stolen item.
The National Archives and Monuments Men Foundation held a press conference on May 8, 2014 to unveil the last known leather-bound album of art works stolen by the Nazis during World War II.
The Monuments Men Foundation donated this rare album known as “Hitler Album No. 6” to the National Archives in Washington, DC on V-E Day, the anniversary of the end of the war in Europe in 1945.
To view the press conference online: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0Je4bz50FM. 
Photo by Michelle Farnsworth. 

The Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR), the so-called “Hitler Albums” document the unprecedented and systematic looting of European art by the Nazis, a story recently brought to the screen by George Clooney in The Monuments Men film. The ERR was the main Nazi agency engaged in art looting in Nazi-occupied countries. As the ERR looted, photographed, and catalogued French collections, they created albums, including the one being donated. Each page of the album shows a photograph of one stolen item.

The National Archives and Monuments Men Foundation held a press conference on May 8, 2014 to unveil the last known leather-bound album of art works stolen by the Nazis during World War II.

The Monuments Men Foundation donated this rare album known as “Hitler Album No. 6” to the National Archives in Washington, DC on V-E Day, the anniversary of the end of the war in Europe in 1945.

To view the press conference online: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0Je4bz50FM

Photo by Michelle Farnsworth.