The American Civil Liberties Union observes the 60th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling with a conversation that explores equal educational opportunities and new barriers to the “promise of Brown” in the 21st century.
Thursday, May 15, at noon in the William G. McGowan Theater at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.
Speakers include Catherine Lhamon, Assistant Secretary for the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education; Dennis Parker, director of the ACLU Racial Justice Project; and Laura Murphy, director of the ACLU Washington Legislative Office.
On Twitter? Use #BrownAt60 to follow along or join in!
Co-sponsored by the Afro-American History Society and the Afro-American Newspapers.
Image: Judgment, Brown v. Board of Education, 05/31/195, National Archives Identifier 301669

The American Civil Liberties Union observes the 60th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling with a conversation that explores equal educational opportunities and new barriers to the “promise of Brown” in the 21st century.

Thursday, May 15, at noon in the William G. McGowan Theater at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.

Speakers include Catherine Lhamon, Assistant Secretary for the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education; Dennis Parker, director of the ACLU Racial Justice Project; and Laura Murphy, director of the ACLU Washington Legislative Office.

On Twitter? Use #BrownAt60 to follow along or join in!

Co-sponsored by the Afro-American History Society and the Afro-American Newspapers.

Image: Judgment, Brown v. Board of Education, 05/31/195, National Archives Identifier 301669

Associate Justice Stephen Breyer is our first guest in a series of conversations with the Supreme Court Justices of the United States.

Yale law professor and Constitutional scholar Akhil Reed Amar will lead the discussion, focusing on ideas, viewpoints, and issues related to the Constitution and their impact on the American people.

Join us on January 14 at 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Details here.

You can also watch the event on our Ustream channel: http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives

Image: Photograph of Supreme Court Building, ARC 594954.

A racially charged criminal trial and a heart-rending love story converge in this 2007 documentary film about Mildred and Richard Loving.
On Thursday, January 9, at 7 p.m. watch a free screening at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Attorney Phil Hirschkop (who pled the case in front of the US Supreme Court)  will discuss the film. (77 minutes.)
The marriage of Mildred (who was part African American black and part Native American) and Richard (who was white) was declared illegal in 1958 by their home state of Virginia. They refused to leave one another and, with the help of the ACLU, pursued their right to happiness.
Their case reached the Supreme Court, which in 1967 struck down laws against interracial marriage in this country. With newly discovered footage of the Lovings and their lawyers, first-person testimony, and rare documentary photographs, this film takes us behind the scenes of the legal challenges and the emotional turmoil of the landmark case.

A racially charged criminal trial and a heart-rending love story converge in this 2007 documentary film about Mildred and Richard Loving.

On Thursday, January 9, at 7 p.m. watch a free screening at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Attorney Phil Hirschkop (who pled the case in front of the US Supreme Court)  will discuss the film. (77 minutes.)

The marriage of Mildred (who was part African American black and part Native American) and Richard (who was white) was declared illegal in 1958 by their home state of Virginia. They refused to leave one another and, with the help of the ACLU, pursued their right to happiness.

Their case reached the Supreme Court, which in 1967 struck down laws against interracial marriage in this country. With newly discovered footage of the Lovings and their lawyers, first-person testimony, and rare documentary photographs, this film takes us behind the scenes of the legal challenges and the emotional turmoil of the landmark case.

On Thursday, November 7, at 7 p.m, a distinguished panel of Civil Rights experts will discuss the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965—and Supreme Court’s recent decision to invalidate key parts of the Voting Rights Act.
The program is free. Enter through the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue. You can also watch on our Ustream channel.
Panelists include Carol Moseley Braun, former Senator from Illinois; Eleanor Holmes Norton, Congresswoman for the District of Columbia; Charles Ferris, Senator Mansfield’s Chief Counsel during the debate about the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act; and political strategist Michael Steele.
Todd Purdum, nationally recognized political journalist and contributing editor at Vanity Fair, will moderate. 
The panel will examine the political challenges and debate that resulted in this groundbreaking legislation while giving a behind-the-scenes look at what it took to pass both acts. They will analyze the impact of these laws as we near their 50-year anniversaries, and the panel will also discuss the Supreme Court’s recent decision to invalidate key parts of the Voting Rights Act.
Presented in celebration of the upcoming December opening of the David M. Rubenstein Gallery "Records of Rights" permanent exhibition, and in partnership with the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress.
Image: Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. [Leaders of the march.], 08/28/1963. National Archives Identifier: 542000

On Thursday, November 7, at 7 p.m, a distinguished panel of Civil Rights experts will discuss the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965—and Supreme Court’s recent decision to invalidate key parts of the Voting Rights Act.

The program is free. Enter through the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue. You can also watch on our Ustream channel.

Panelists include Carol Moseley Braun, former Senator from Illinois; Eleanor Holmes Norton, Congresswoman for the District of Columbia; Charles Ferris, Senator Mansfield’s Chief Counsel during the debate about the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act; and political strategist Michael Steele.

Todd Purdum, nationally recognized political journalist and contributing editor at Vanity Fair, will moderate.

The panel will examine the political challenges and debate that resulted in this groundbreaking legislation while giving a behind-the-scenes look at what it took to pass both acts. They will analyze the impact of these laws as we near their 50-year anniversaries, and the panel will also discuss the Supreme Court’s recent decision to invalidate key parts of the Voting Rights Act.

Presented in celebration of the upcoming December opening of the David M. Rubenstein Gallery "Records of Rights" permanent exhibition, and in partnership with the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress.

Image: Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. [Leaders of the march.], 08/28/1963. National Archives Identifier: 542000

Happy Constitution Day! The Constitution is 226 years old, and is the oldest written constitution still in use today. It is on permanent display at the National Archives in Washington, DC. You can see a high-res image and read a transcript of the Constitution here: http://go.usa.gov/D5VRTop Five Facts about the Constitution!Five: The Constitution has 4,543 words, including the signatures. It takes about 30 minutes to read.Four: Two of the first 12 amendments submitted were rejected; the remaining ten became the Bill of Rights.Three: The Chief Justice is mentioned in the Constitution, but the number of Justices is not specified.Two: Only one amendment to the Constitution has been repealed: the 18th (Prohibition).One: The Constitution does not give us our rights and liberties, but it does guarantee them. For more Constitution myth busting, read today’s blog post: http://go.usa.gov/D5kJ

Happy Constitution Day! The Constitution is 226 years old, and is the oldest written constitution still in use today. It is on permanent display at the National Archives in Washington, DC. You can see a high-res image and read a transcript of the Constitution here: http://go.usa.gov/D5VR

Top Five Facts about the Constitution!

Five: The Constitution has 4,543 words, including the signatures. It takes about 30 minutes to read.

Four: Two of the first 12 amendments submitted were rejected; the remaining ten became the Bill of Rights.

Three: The Chief Justice is mentioned in the Constitution, but the number of Justices is not specified.

Two: Only one amendment to the Constitution has been repealed: the 18th (Prohibition).

One: The Constitution does not give us our rights and liberties, but it does guarantee them.

For more Constitution myth busting, read today’s blog post: http://go.usa.gov/D5kJ

Join us in celebrating the 225th anniversary of the Constitution with Yale Law Professor Akhil Amar and special guest Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas as they explore the past, present, and future of the nation’s founding document.
On Wednesday, September 12, at 7 p.m., join us in the National Archives building in the William G. McGowan Theater for “The Constitution Turns 225”
Presented in partnership with the Federalist Society and the Constitutional Accountability Center.
Seating is limited and on a first-come, first-served basis. No reservations are accepted. Free tickets are distributed at the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue, 60 minutes prior to start time. You must be present to receive a ticket. Theater doors open 30 minutes prior to start time.

Join us in celebrating the 225th anniversary of the Constitution with Yale Law Professor Akhil Amar and special guest Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas as they explore the past, present, and future of the nation’s founding document.

On Wednesday, September 12, at 7 p.m., join us in the National Archives building in the William G. McGowan Theater for “The Constitution Turns 225”

Presented in partnership with the Federalist Society and the Constitutional Accountability Center.

Seating is limited and on a first-come, first-served basis. No reservations are accepted. Free tickets are distributed at the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue, 60 minutes prior to start time. You must be present to receive a ticket. Theater doors open 30 minutes prior to start time.