President Eisenhower and Pearl Harbor

A special exhibit featuring documents and artifacts from the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum holdings will be on display through December 2011 in the Library and Museum building lobbies to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor. Artifacts in the exhibit include Pearl Harbor posters, buttons, sheet music and commemorative stamps, as well as Japanese military items.

This Wednesday is the 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The National Archives in Washington, DC, is hosting two free public programs in commemoration of this event.
Wednesday, December 7, at noonJefferson RoomPacific Gibraltar: US–Japanese Rivalry Over the Annexation of Hawaii, 1885–1889William Michael Morgan discusses his book Pacific Gibraltar and the results of the Japan–U.S. crisis of 1897, when the Japanese sent warships to Honolulu to oppose the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands by the United States during the Spanish-American War. As Japan began pushing for voting rights for its nationals living and working on the islands, tensions rose between the two countries. A book signing will follow the program.


Wednesday, December 7, at 7 p.m.William G. McGowan TheaterIn Commemoration of the 70th Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor“It Is No Joke—It Is a Real War”: How Americans First Learned of Pearl Harbor Journalist Marvin Kalb uses film, audio, and photographic records from the National Archives and the Newseum to discuss how the media informed Americans of the 1941 attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Presented in partnership with the Newseum.
(Image: The USS Arizona (BB-39) burning after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 12/07/1941, ARC 195617)

This Wednesday is the 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The National Archives in Washington, DC, is hosting two free public programs in commemoration of this event.

Wednesday, December 7, at noon
Jefferson Room
Pacific Gibraltar: US–Japanese Rivalry Over the Annexation of Hawaii, 1885–1889

William Michael Morgan discusses his book Pacific Gibraltar and the results of the Japan–U.S. crisis of 1897, when the Japanese sent warships to Honolulu to oppose the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands by the United States during the Spanish-American War. As Japan began pushing for voting rights for its nationals living and working on the islands, tensions rose between the two countries. A book signing will follow the program.

Wednesday, December 7, at 7 p.m.
William G. McGowan Theater
In Commemoration of the 70th Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor
“It Is No Joke—It Is a Real War”: How Americans First Learned of Pearl Harbor

Journalist Marvin Kalb uses film, audio, and photographic records from the National Archives and the Newseum to discuss how the media informed Americans of the 1941 attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Presented in partnership with the Newseum.

(Image: The USS Arizona (BB-39) burning after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 12/07/1941, ARC 195617)