Chun Wing Kwong was deported on February 12, 1915, because of these cigarettes. He was attempting to enter the United States through Honolulu, Hawaii. He claimed to be the son of a Chinese merchant who ran a store in Honolulu.

But inspectors found a note in Chinese inside the cigarette book. These “coaching notes” were often smuggled to Chinese detainees so that the answers they gave in the interviews would match the answers of their family and friends. The inspectors decided the note was evidence of fraud, and Wing Kwong was sent back.

This story is one of many from "Attachments," our current exhibit that uses documents from immigrants who entered, or attempted to enter, the United States.

The last day to see the exhibit is September 4—don’t miss it!
http://www.archives.gov/nae/visit/gallery.html
American historian Erika Lee found her Chinese grandmother’s file while doing research at the National Archives in San Bruno, California. When 27-year-old Wong Lan Fong and her new husband, Yee Shew Ning, traveled to the United States, they were aware of anti-Chinese prejudices. They took measures to emphasize their respectability and economic status. They delayed their departure for the United States until they had enough money to travel in first class. They also submitted a letter from the clergyman who performed their wedding ceremony, attesting to their good character. Immigration officials seized further evidence when they confiscated the couple’s wedding photograph as proof of their marriage. The couple’s strategy worked. They were detained on Angel Island only one day before being allowed to land. Some 70 years later, their granddaughter, American historian Erika Lee, was conducting research for her book on Chinese immigration at the National Archives in San Bruno, California, when she discovered her grandparents’ wedding photograph in her grandmother’s immigration file. Since the photo was not returned and her grandparents could not make a copy, she had never seen it before.
Our “Attachments” exhibit closes September 4, so catch it while you can (http://www.archives.gov/nae/visit/gallery.html)!

American historian Erika Lee found her Chinese grandmother’s file while doing research at the National Archives in San Bruno, California.

When 27-year-old Wong Lan Fong and her new husband, Yee Shew Ning, traveled to the United States, they were aware of anti-Chinese prejudices. They took measures to emphasize their respectability and economic status. They delayed their departure for the United States until they had enough money to travel in first class. They also submitted a letter from the clergyman who performed their wedding ceremony, attesting to their good character.

Immigration officials seized further evidence when they confiscated the couple’s wedding photograph as proof of their marriage. The couple’s strategy worked. They were detained on Angel Island only one day before being allowed to land.

Some 70 years later, their granddaughter, American historian Erika Lee, was conducting research for her book on Chinese immigration at the National Archives in San Bruno, California, when she discovered her grandparents’ wedding photograph in her grandmother’s immigration file. Since the photo was not returned and her grandparents could not make a copy, she had never seen it before.

Our “Attachments” exhibit closes September 4, so catch it while you can (http://www.archives.gov/nae/visit/gallery.html)!

riversidearchives
Another fascinating record from the 1930s! What will the 1940 Census reveal about Anna May Wong? Just 32 days left until researchers can find out….
riversidearchives:

40 days to the 1940 Census
no. 8
Anna May Wong was Hollywood’s first Chinese-American movie star in the 1930s.  Until the period of Asian exclusion in the United States in 1943, she was required to register with the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) when traveling internationally.  Not every woman can be this beautiful even in an immigration mug shot!
This document is taken from her INS Case File in the records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (RG 85) at the National Archives in Riverside.

Another fascinating record from the 1930s! What will the 1940 Census reveal about Anna May Wong? Just 32 days left until researchers can find out….

riversidearchives:

40 days to the 1940 Census

no. 8

Anna May Wong was Hollywood’s first Chinese-American movie star in the 1930s. Until the period of Asian exclusion in the United States in 1943, she was required to register with the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) when traveling internationally. Not every woman can be this beautiful even in an immigration mug shot!

This document is taken from her INS Case File in the records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (RG 85) at the National Archives in Riverside.