Nine months after opening in a new location at the historic Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House building at One Bowling Green, the National Archives at New York City welcomed its 10,000th visitor.Staff met the Russell family at the Welcome Center with the news and a copy of the book “Our Land, Your Land.” The Russells were excited and happily posed for a photo. 
Staff asked if they were here to do research and learned that the Mrs. Russell needed documentation to get her passport. Staff were able to locate her and her family on the 1940 Census and provide a certified copy that day.

Nine months after opening in a new location at the historic Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House building at One Bowling Green, the National Archives at New York City welcomed its 10,000th visitor.

Staff met the Russell family at the Welcome Center with the news and a copy of the book “Our Land, Your Land.” The Russells were excited and happily posed for a photo.

Staff asked if they were here to do research and learned that the Mrs. Russell needed documentation to get her passport. Staff were able to locate her and her family on the 1940 Census and provide a certified copy that day.

Chuck Norris is in the 1940 Census. He’s one month old.
 Staff at the National Archives in Kansas City knew Chuck Norris was born in March of 1940. This is just before the deadline to be included on the 1940 Census, which was taken April 1, 1940. 
They found him on the 1940 Census as Carlos Ray Norris, living with his parents in Ryan City, Oklahoma, near the Oklahoma/Texas border. 
 Even Chuck Norris shows up in National Archives records!
Text and image via the National Archives at Kansas City.

Chuck Norris is in the 1940 Census. He’s one month old.

Staff at the National Archives in Kansas City knew Chuck Norris was born in March of 1940. This is just before the deadline to be included on the 1940 Census, which was taken April 1, 1940.

They found him on the 1940 Census as Carlos Ray Norris, living with his parents in Ryan City, Oklahoma, near the Oklahoma/Texas border.

Even Chuck Norris shows up in National Archives records!

Text and image via the National Archives at Kansas City.

Stumped by the census? Get help from a National Archives expert this Saturday!   Claire Kluskens will discuss census search strategies for our “beyond the basics” archival research skills lecture.
Join us Saturday, October 20, at 10 a.m. in Room G-25, in the Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance) of the National Archives building.
Image: Actor Cesar Romero is interviewed by the census enumerator for the 1950 Census.

Stumped by the census? Get help from a National Archives expert this Saturday!   Claire Kluskens will discuss census search strategies for our “beyond the basics” archival research skills lecture.

Join us Saturday, October 20, at 10 a.m. in Room G-25, in the Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance) of the National Archives building.

Image: Actor Cesar Romero is interviewed by the census enumerator for the 1950 Census.

We released the 1940 census on April 2, and this Thursday at 7 pm, we host a program on the radio shows that Americans of that era listened to!
Ed Walker, host of WAMU’s longest-running radio show “The Big Broadcast,” and Rob Bamberger, host of “Hot Jazz Saturday Night,” will discuss the history of the show. They’ll also present a sampling of the vintage radio broadcasts and discuss how the programs enriched the lives of Americans in the 1930s and 1940s. (Details here: http://go.usa.gov/VvU) 
What radio shows or stations did your family listen to when you were growing up?

We released the 1940 census on April 2, and this Thursday at 7 pm, we host a program on the radio shows that Americans of that era listened to!

Ed Walker, host of WAMU’s longest-running radio show “The Big Broadcast,” and Rob Bamberger, host of “Hot Jazz Saturday Night,” will discuss the history of the show. They’ll also present a sampling of the vintage radio broadcasts and discuss how the programs enriched the lives of Americans in the 1930s and 1940s. (Details here: http://go.usa.gov/VvU)

What radio shows or stations did your family listen to when you were growing up?

Just 2 days until the release of the 1940 Census!

The 1940 census also included special housing census that had 31 housing questions that asked if there was refrigeration, running water, a radio, flush toilets or outhouses, and whether the house was lit by electricity, gas, or kerosene.

 (The Census of Housing for 1940 did NOT survive and the only information available today are the statistical reports compiled by the Bureau of the Census. Those reports are available on the Census Bureau web site.)

This house was photographed by Dorothea Lange in March of 1940 in Olivehurst, California. 

The original caption reads “The beginnings of a new home. The house-trailer has been raised on posts and has an extension built on it for enlarged sleeping quarters. Note electricity, the beginnings of a flower garden, rubber tires probably used for fuel, also rabbit in shadow of trailer. Typical Oliverhurst homes in background.” 

Do you know if your family used electricity, gas, or kerosene for indoor lighting in the 1930s?
Just 2 days until the release of the 1940 Census!
The 1940 census also included special housing census that had 31 housing questions that asked if there was refrigeration, running water, a radio, flush toilets or outhouses, and whether the house was lit by electricity, gas, or kerosene.

(The Census of Housing for 1940 did NOT survive and the only information available today are the statistical reports compiled by the Bureau of the Census. Those reports are available on the Census Bureau web site.)

This house was photographed by Dorothea Lange in March of 1940 in Olivehurst, California.

The original caption reads “The beginnings of a new home. The house-trailer has been raised on posts and has an extension built on it for enlarged sleeping quarters. Note electricity, the beginnings of a flower garden, rubber tires probably used for fuel, also rabbit in shadow of trailer. Typical Oliverhurst homes in background.”

Do you know if your family used electricity, gas, or kerosene for indoor lighting in the 1930s?
Just 4 more days until the release of the 1940 Census!
This census is a first for the National Archives: it’s the first time we have digitized and released the millions of census images online.
You’ll be able to search the 1940 Census online at 9 a.m. on April 2! (And join us at 8.30 am to watch the event streamed live from the National Archives—a link to the live streaming will be available here.)
This infographic comes from A Snapshot in Time on the U.S. Census Bureau website.

Just 4 more days until the release of the 1940 Census!

This census is a first for the National Archives: it’s the first time we have digitized and released the millions of census images online.

You’ll be able to search the 1940 Census online at 9 a.m. on April 2! (And join us at 8.30 am to watch the event streamed live from the National Archives—a link to the live streaming will be available here.)

This infographic comes from A Snapshot in Time on the U.S. Census Bureau website.