One more #museumselfie for today! Michael Pupa stands in front of the photograph of himself, age 12, found in his immigration file. His photograph was part of our exhibit “Attachments” in 2012.
His parents were victims of the Nazis when he was only four, and he and his uncle spent two years hiding in the forests of Poland, waiting until the end of World War II.
But the ordeal of Michael Pupa was far from over. He became a “displaced person,” or DP, moving from one DP camp to another until 1951, when Michael, by then 12, and his cousin were flown to the United States and sent to a home for refugee children, then to foster homes in Cleveland.
But his long journey finally concluded with a happy ending for Michael!
In Cleveland, Michael was placed with foster parents Edward and Bernice Rosenthal, who raised him along with their children, Cheryl and Allyne, as part of their family. In 1957, Michael Pupa, “Occupation: student,” became a U.S. citizen.
You can read his full story in Prologue magazine.

One more #museumselfie for today! Michael Pupa stands in front of the photograph of himself, age 12, found in his immigration file. His photograph was part of our exhibit “Attachments” in 2012.

His parents were victims of the Nazis when he was only four, and he and his uncle spent two years hiding in the forests of Poland, waiting until the end of World War II.

But the ordeal of Michael Pupa was far from over. He became a “displaced person,” or DP, moving from one DP camp to another until 1951, when Michael, by then 12, and his cousin were flown to the United States and sent to a home for refugee children, then to foster homes in Cleveland.

But his long journey finally concluded with a happy ending for Michael!

In Cleveland, Michael was placed with foster parents Edward and Bernice Rosenthal, who raised him along with their children, Cheryl and Allyne, as part of their family. In 1957, Michael Pupa, “Occupation: student,” became a U.S. citizen.

You can read his full story in Prologue magazine.