Can bears eat dynamite with no ill effect? Readers will never know. 
Ninety-four years ago this month, Robert Ripley debuted a new name for his newspaper column, one that would spin off into books, comics, television shows, and even tourist attractions–“Believe it or Not!” While December 19, 1918, was the initial debut of Robert Ripley’s first cartoon in the New York Globe, it wasn’t until the following year that he renamed it to the brand that we recognize today. The company has steadfastly maintained that all claims they use have been researched, and this letter found in our Glacier National Park holdings seems to corroborate that. 
Enclosed with this letter—asking if a tip about bears eating dynamite in the park was true—was a detailed questionnaire about the incident that was to be filled out and sent back to Ripley’s. Unfortunately the park could not confirm the story and so readers of the column in the 1960s never got to see this story illustrated. (Image source; RG 079 Records of the National Park Service, Accession 8NS-79-97-436, “Numerical Subject Files 1949-1965,” Box 16, ARC identifier 1048616)
Today’s post comes from the National Archives at Denver.

Can bears eat dynamite with no ill effect? Readers will never know.

Ninety-four years ago this month, Robert Ripley debuted a new name for his newspaper column, one that would spin off into books, comics, television shows, and even tourist attractions–“Believe it or Not!”

While December 19, 1918, was the initial debut of Robert Ripley’s first cartoon in the New York Globe, it wasn’t until the following year that he renamed it to the brand that we recognize today. The company has steadfastly maintained that all claims they use have been researched, and this letter found in our Glacier National Park holdings seems to corroborate that.

Enclosed with this letter—asking if a tip about bears eating dynamite in the park was true—was a detailed questionnaire about the incident that was to be filled out and sent back to Ripley’s. Unfortunately the park could not confirm the story and so readers of the column in the 1960s never got to see this story illustrated.

(Image source; RG 079 Records of the National Park Service, Accession 8NS-79-97-436, “Numerical Subject Files 1949-1965,” Box 16, ARC identifier 1048616)

Today’s post comes from the National Archives at Denver.

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    I love the handwritten comment about Canada.
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