Happy 100th birthday to the 17th Amendment!
In the 1850s, U.S. senators were selected by the state legislatures. But political problems in states resulted in many seats going empty for long periods. Support grew slowly for popular, or direct, election of senators by voters.Strong resistance in the Senate to a proposed Constitutional amendment calling for direct elections meant the idea got nowhere for many years.
Finally, in 1911, the Senate approved a proposed Amendment allowing direct election, and the House followed suit the next year. It won approval by the required three-fourths of the state legislatures by April 8, 1913, and was declared part of the Constitution, the 17th Amendment, on May 31 by Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan.
Read the full post on the Prologue blog.

Happy 100th birthday to the 17th Amendment!

In the 1850s, U.S. senators were selected by the state legislatures. But political problems in states resulted in many seats going empty for long periods. Support grew slowly for popular, or direct, election of senators by voters.

Strong resistance in the Senate to a proposed Constitutional amendment calling for direct elections meant the idea got nowhere for many years.

Finally, in 1911, the Senate approved a proposed Amendment allowing direct election, and the House followed suit the next year. It won approval by the required three-fourths of the state legislatures by April 8, 1913, and was declared part of the Constitution, the 17th Amendment, on May 31 by Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan.

Read the full post on the Prologue blog.