The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism
The expansion of slavery in the decades after American independence, says historian Edward Baptist, drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew to become a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy trying to find ways to make slavery more profitable. A book signing follows the program.
Wednesday, September 10, at noon in the William G. McGowan Theater
The discussion will be streamed live on YouTube.

The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism

The expansion of slavery in the decades after American independence, says historian Edward Baptist, drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew to become a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy trying to find ways to make slavery more profitable. A book signing follows the program.

Wednesday, September 10, at noon in the William G. McGowan Theater


The discussion will be streamed live on YouTube.

Making Their Mark Adult Education Workshop Series: From Quill to Rollerball
Combine a special evening viewing of the “Making Their Mark” exhibit with a hands-on exploration of the history of pens with Geoff Parker, great-grandson of George S. Parker, founder of the Parker Pen Company. Discover how pens and writing have changed over time. To register, email education@nara.gov with MTM Workshops as the subject.
Wednesday, September 10, 5:30–7:30 p.m. in the Boeing Learning Center.
“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives with generous support of Lead Sponsor AT&T. Major additional support provided by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family and members of the Board of the Foundation for the National Archives.
Family and educational programming related to “Making Their Mark” is sponsored in part by Fahrney’s Pens, Cross, and Parker Pen Company—Newell Rubbermaid.
Photograph by Jeff Reed

Making Their Mark Adult Education Workshop Series: From Quill to Rollerball

Combine a special evening viewing of the “Making Their Mark” exhibit with a hands-on exploration of the history of pens with Geoff Parker, great-grandson of George S. Parker, founder of the Parker Pen Company. Discover how pens and writing have changed over time. To register, email education@nara.gov with MTM Workshops as the subject.

Wednesday, September 10, 5:30–7:30 p.m. in the Boeing Learning Center.

“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives with generous support of Lead Sponsor AT&T. Major additional support provided by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family and members of the Board of the Foundation for the National Archives.

Family and educational programming related to “Making Their Mark” is sponsored in part by Fahrney’s Pens, Cross, and Parker Pen Company—Newell Rubbermaid.

Photograph by Jeff Reed

In 1925, the Amalgamated Clothing Workers led a strike against the Curlee Clothing Company in St. Louis demanding the right to organize protection against unfair discharge of workers, clean and sanitary working conditions, time and a half for overtime, and a wage increase of 25 per cent in the tailor shops and of various amounts in the cutting department. Image: National Archives Identifier 283591.

In 1925, the Amalgamated Clothing Workers led a strike against the Curlee Clothing Company in St. Louis demanding the right to organize protection against unfair discharge of workers, clean and sanitary working conditions, time and a half for overtime, and a wage increase of 25 per cent in the tailor shops and of various amounts in the cutting department. Image: National Archives Identifier 283591.

Atlas of the Battlefield of Antietam
In recognition of the anniversary of the Civil War battle at Antietam, Jamesina Thatcher examines 10 hand-drawn maps created by veterans of the battle for the Atlas.
Tuesday, September 9, at 11 a.m. at the National Archives at Washington, DC, Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance)Thursday, September 11, at 11 a.m. Repeated at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room B
Image: http://www.loc.gov/resource/g3842am.gcw0247000/#seq-1

Atlas of the Battlefield of Antietam

In recognition of the anniversary of the Civil War battle at Antietam, Jamesina Thatcher examines 10 hand-drawn maps created by veterans of the battle for the Atlas.

Tuesday, September 9, at 11 a.m. at the National Archives at Washington, DC, Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance)

Thursday, September 11, at 11 a.m. Repeated at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room B

Image: http://www.loc.gov/resource/g3842am.gcw0247000/#seq-1

Chicago, Illinois-Mechanical aids to new habits of drinking are demonstrated by pretty misses in costumes especially designed for the cocktail hour. The scene at the end of the clip shows a woman wearing a dress with the names of different liquors, or literally a cocktail dress. This short newsreel definitely captures the fun, carefree nature of the Roaring 20s! National Archives Identifier: 100520

Today we celebrate National Wildlife Day with a few photos from our online records database, http://research.archives.gov/search/. There is a wealth of wildlife images in our records.

What images can you find in our online database? Post them with #ArchivesWildlife and we’ll try to reblog them!

We have started a board on Pinterest with more images: http://www.pinterest.com/usnatarchives/wildlife-in-national-archives-records/. 

todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

#Wilderness50!  The Gila Wilderness:

Trail of the Mountain Spirits Scenic Byway - Riding Beneath Cliffs in the Gila Wilderness
Packing along the Gila River, the traveler pauses to sense the quiet on this riverside campground below jagged tan cliffs.
Location: New Mexico (33.183° N 108.207° W) Status: Public domain. Photo by Joe Burgess

The Gila Wilderness of New Mexico - the first wilderness area to be protected under the Wilderness Act and just one of the many images of wilderness areas to be found in National Archives holdings. 
(Submitted by usnatarchives!)
Share your favorite wilderness with the #Wilderness50 tag!

todaysdocument:

#Wilderness50!  The Gila Wilderness:

Trail of the Mountain Spirits Scenic Byway - Riding Beneath Cliffs in the Gila Wilderness

Packing along the Gila River, the traveler pauses to sense the quiet on this riverside campground below jagged tan cliffs.

Location: New Mexico (33.183° N 108.207° W)
Status: Public domain. Photo by Joe Burgess

The Gila Wilderness of New Mexico - the first wilderness area to be protected under the Wilderness Act and just one of the many images of wilderness areas to be found in National Archives holdings

(Submitted by usnatarchives!)

Share your favorite wilderness with the #Wilderness50 tag!

Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas
Join us as Cass R. Sunstein, the nation’s most-cited legal scholar, discusses his latest book Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas, a compilation of his most famous, insightful, relevant, and inflammatory pieces. Sunstein cuts through the fog of left vs. right arguments and offers logical, evidence-based solutions to today’s most challenging questions. A book signing follows the program.
Monday, September 8, at noon in the William G. McGowan Theater.
The discussion will be streamed live on YouTube. 

Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas

Join us as Cass R. Sunstein, the nation’s most-cited legal scholar, discusses his latest book Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas, a compilation of his most famous, insightful, relevant, and inflammatory pieces. Sunstein cuts through the fog of left vs. right arguments and offers logical, evidence-based solutions to today’s most challenging questions. A book signing follows the program.

Monday, September 8, at noon in the William G. McGowan Theater.

The discussion will be streamed live on YouTube

In this photo taken outdoors in winter, Roma Spencer (later Mrs. Rochester C. Colgan II, a relative of President Truman) and Frances Hill (mother of donor, Nancy Ehrlich) are both dressed in fur-trimmed coats. In the latter half of the decade, coats featured both real and fake fur collars. For the upper classes, popular fur trim included mink, possum, raccoon, seal, fox, sable, and beaver while those who could not afford the real thing opted for synthetic Siberian fur cloth. Any guesses to which type they are wearing? Image: Roma Spencer and Frances Hill, ca. 1927. Courtesy of Harry S. Truman Library. National Archives ID: 6233739
 

In this photo taken outdoors in winter, Roma Spencer (later Mrs. Rochester C. Colgan II, a relative of President Truman) and Frances Hill (mother of donor, Nancy Ehrlich) are both dressed in fur-trimmed coats. In the latter half of the decade, coats featured both real and fake fur collars. For the upper classes, popular fur trim included mink, possum, raccoon, seal, fox, sable, and beaver while those who could not afford the real thing opted for synthetic Siberian fur cloth. Any guesses to which type they are wearing? Image: Roma Spencer and Frances Hill, ca. 1927. Courtesy of Harry S. Truman Library. National Archives ID: 6233739

 

During his stay in Paris, Hemingway found himself living in the center of the fashion and art world with his wife Elizabeth and fellow writer friends like James Joyce and Ezra Pound. In this picture of the couple on a trip to Switzerland, Elizabeth is pictured with the “bob” hairstyle, which was all the rage during the Roaring 20s. The “bob” was simply a blunt cut, level with the bottom of the ears all around the head, and it was commonly worn either with bangs or with the hair brushed off of the forehead. Much simpler than the long feminine looks of earlier decades, the “bob” embodied the embolden, free-spirited style of the flapper era. Courtesy of John F. Kennedy Library. Image: Ernest Hemingway and Elizabeth Hadley Richardson in Chamby, Switzerland. Winter 1922. Accession Number: EH08095P

During his stay in Paris, Hemingway found himself living in the center of the fashion and art world with his wife Elizabeth and fellow writer friends like James Joyce and Ezra Pound. In this picture of the couple on a trip to Switzerland, Elizabeth is pictured with the “bob” hairstyle, which was all the rage during the Roaring 20s. The “bob” was simply a blunt cut, level with the bottom of the ears all around the head, and it was commonly worn either with bangs or with the hair brushed off of the forehead. Much simpler than the long feminine looks of earlier decades, the “bob” embodied the embolden, free-spirited style of the flapper era. Courtesy of John F. Kennedy Library. Image: Ernest Hemingway and Elizabeth Hadley Richardson in Chamby, Switzerland. Winter 1922. Accession Number: EH08095P