A Time for Justice and Mighty Times: The Children’s March
In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, we present two Academy Award-winning documentaries. A Time for Justice (1994; 38 minutes) depicts the battle for civil rights as told by its foot soldiers. Directed by four-time Academy Award winner Charles Guggenheim, the film reveals the heroism of individuals who risked their lives for the cause of freedom and equality. Mighty Times: The Children’s March (2004; 40 minutes) tells the story of how the young people of Birmingham, Alabama, braved fire hoses and police dogs in 1963 and brought segregation to its knees. 
Tuesday, July 1, at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Both films are being screened courtesy of Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center.
Image: Civil Rights Act of 1964 , 07/02/1964 National Archives Identifier: 299891. 

A Time for Justice and Mighty Times: The Children’s March

In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, we present two Academy Award-winning documentaries. A Time for Justice (1994; 38 minutes) depicts the battle for civil rights as told by its foot soldiers. Directed by four-time Academy Award winner Charles Guggenheim, the film reveals the heroism of individuals who risked their lives for the cause of freedom and equality. Mighty Times: The Children’s March (2004; 40 minutes) tells the story of how the young people of Birmingham, Alabama, braved fire hoses and police dogs in 1963 and brought segregation to its knees. 

Tuesday, July 1, at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Both films are being screened courtesy of Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Image: Civil Rights Act of 1964 , 07/02/1964 National Archives Identifier: 299891. 

On Friday, the Washington Capitals mascot, Slapshot, stopped by the National Archives. He posed in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom with David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, and checked out the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, and the Bill of Rights.

Go Caps!

National Archives photo by Jeffrey Reed

Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns
Join us for Episode Six: Swing: The Velocity of Celebration. In the late 1930s, commerce sometimes leads to compromise, and the heart of jazz is often kept under wraps. But in the middle of the country a new kind of music is incubating. (105 minutes.)
Friday, June 27 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns

Join us for Episode Six: Swing: The Velocity of CelebrationIn the late 1930s, commerce sometimes leads to compromise, and the heart of jazz is often kept under wraps. But in the middle of the country a new kind of music is incubating. (105 minutes.)

Friday, June 27 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Powdered Wigs

Making wigs such as the ones above is one of many activities we will have in the Boeing Learning Center during July 4. 

The National Archives in Washington, DC celebrates the 238th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 2014. Highlights include fife & drum music, dramatic historical readings, archives exhibits, family activities and entertainment, all free and open to the public. 

To find out more about July 4 at the National Archives. To see a promo video

National Archives Photo by Jeffrey Reed. 

Francis Scott Key made his mark as an American icon by one single and unforgettable act: writing The Star-Spangled Banner. Historian Marc Leepson reveals unexplored details of the life of an American patriot whose legacy has been largely unknown until now. 
Join us on Thursday, June 26 at noon. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rf6oq855QkE) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing follows the program.

Francis Scott Key made his mark as an American icon by one single and unforgettable act: writing The Star-Spangled Banner. Historian Marc Leepson reveals unexplored details of the life of an American patriot whose legacy has been largely unknown until now.

Join us on Thursday, June 26 at noon. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rf6oq855QkE) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing follows the program.

Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra in Concert

Celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival, the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra Ensemble will feature songs performed by composers and musician ambassadors who presented American jazz to international audiences. 

Thursday, June 26 at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution).

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

ourpresidents:

Title IX 

Forty-two years ago, President Richard Nixon signed the Education Amendments of 1972, which has come to be known as Title IX.  The amendment did not specifically mention sports, but it’s far-reaching impact is widely credited for opening up opportunities for women in athletics.  

Images from: An Act of June 23, 1972, Public Law 92-318, 86 STAT 235, to Amend the Higher Education Act of 1965, the Vocational Educational Act of 1963, the General Education Provisions Act (Creating a National Foundation for Postsecondary Education and a National Institute of Education), the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, Public Law 874, Eighty-First Congress, and Related Acts, and for Other Purposes, 6/23/1972.

Sally Ride made history and inspired several generations of women when NASA chose her for the seventh shuttle mission. Lynn Sherr discusses the life of this fascinating woman whose life intersected with revolutionary social and scientific changes in America. A book signing will follow the program.
Join us on Wednesday, June 25 at noon. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GzQcb6lnwA) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
"Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives with the generous support of Lead Sponsor AT&T. Major additional support provided by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family and members of the Board of the Foundation for the National Archives.
Family and educational programming related to “Making Their Mark”is sponsored in part by Fahrney’s Pens, Cross, and Parker Pen Company - Newell Rubbermaid.

Sally Ride made history and inspired several generations of women when NASA chose her for the seventh shuttle mission. Lynn Sherr discusses the life of this fascinating woman whose life intersected with revolutionary social and scientific changes in America. A book signing will follow the program.

Join us on Wednesday, June 25 at noon. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GzQcb6lnwA) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

"Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives with the generous support of Lead Sponsor AT&T. Major additional support provided by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family and members of the Board of the Foundation for the National Archives.

Family and educational programming related to “Making Their Mark”is sponsored in part by Fahrney’s Pens, Cross, and Parker Pen Company - Newell Rubbermaid.

In celebration of the 80th anniversary of the establishment of the National Archives, we present a selection of archival films including Your National Archives (195 minutes) and The Washington Parade: The Archives. (70 minutes.)
Tuesday, June 24 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution).
Image: View of the construction of the National Archives Building, November 2, 1933. Records of the Public Building Service, National Archives, Washington, DC. 

In celebration of the 80th anniversary of the establishment of the National Archives, we present a selection of archival films including Your National Archives (195 minutes) and The Washington Parade: The Archives. (70 minutes.)

Tuesday, June 24 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution).

Image: View of the construction of the National Archives Building, November 2, 1933. Records of the Public Building Service, National Archives, Washington, DC. 

Family historians, please join us next week for “National Archives Records on Ancestry.com” with Chad Milliner of Ancestry.com. Tuesday, June 24, from 11 a.m. to noon in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance).
Repeated on Thursday, June 26, from 11 a.m. to noon at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room C. 
Topics covered include:• How Ancestry works with the National Archives• Long term projects underway•  Collections added recently•  Hidden Gems•  Sneak Peek of “Coming Attractions”

Family historians, please join us next week for “National Archives Records on Ancestry.com” with Chad Milliner of Ancestry.com.
 
Tuesday, June 24, from 11 a.m. to noon in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance).

Repeated on Thursday, June 26, from 11 a.m. to noon at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room C. 

Topics covered include:
• How Ancestry works with the National Archives
• Long term projects underway
  Collections added recently
  Hidden Gems
  Sneak Peek of “Coming Attractions”