Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns
Join us for Episode Seven: Dedicated to Chaos. During World War II, swing became a symbol of democracy at home. Bandleaders enlisted and took their music to the armed forces overseas. The new style of “bebop” began to spread, altering the course of jazz forever. (120 minutes.)
Friday, July 11 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns

Join us for Episode Seven: Dedicated to ChaosDuring World War II, swing became a symbol of democracy at home. Bandleaders enlisted and took their music to the armed forces overseas. The new style of “bebop” began to spread, altering the course of jazz forever. (120 minutes.)

Friday, July 11 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Constitution-in-Action Learning Lab Family Program
Families act as researchers and archivists during a two-hour simulation as they help the President and his communications director prepare for a press conference by locating and analyzing facsimile documents to find the connection to the Constitution. This is a great way to explore history, learn about the National Archives, and understand the role the Constitution plays in our daily lives.
Join us on Thursday, July 10 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2:00-4:00 p.m. in the Boeing Learning Center. Reservations are required at least 24 hours in advance. Email learninglab@nara.gov with date and time, names of adults and children, phone number, and mailing address.

Constitution-in-Action Learning Lab Family Program

Families act as researchers and archivists during a two-hour simulation as they help the President and his communications director prepare for a press conference by locating and analyzing facsimile documents to find the connection to the Constitution. This is a great way to explore history, learn about the National Archives, and understand the role the Constitution plays in our daily lives.

Join us on Thursday, July 10 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2:00-4:00 p.m. in the Boeing Learning CenterReservations are required at least 24 hours in advance. Email learninglab@nara.gov with date and time, names of adults and children, phone number, and mailing address.

Washington’s Civil War Forts and Parks
During the Civil War, the Union army constructed a series of earthen defenses in and around Washington to protect the nation’s capital from attack. The defeat of Confederate forces at one of these―Fort Stevens―helped keep Washington in Union control. Dr. B. Franklin Cooling, historian, author, and Professor of History, National Defense University, Loretta Neumann, Vice President, Alliance to Preserve the Civil War Defenses of Washington, and Kym Elder, Program Manager, Civil War Defenses of Washington, National Park Service, will discuss the development of Washington’s Civil War forts, their role in the war, and their ensuing transformation into the public parks and cultural resources known as the Fort Circle Parks. 
Join us on Thursday, July 10 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wi_3gB6qpGo) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
This program is presented in partnership with the National Capital Planning Commission and will function as the informal kick-off for the official commemoration of the 150th anniversary of The Battle of Fort Stevens. 

Washington’s Civil War Forts and Parks

During the Civil War, the Union army constructed a series of earthen defenses in and around Washington to protect the nation’s capital from attack. The defeat of Confederate forces at one of these―Fort Stevens―helped keep Washington in Union control. Dr. B. Franklin Cooling, historian, author, and Professor of History, National Defense University, Loretta Neumann, Vice President, Alliance to Preserve the Civil War Defenses of Washington, and Kym Elder, Program Manager, Civil War Defenses of Washington, National Park Service, will discuss the development of Washington’s Civil War forts, their role in the war, and their ensuing transformation into the public parks and cultural resources known as the Fort Circle Parks.

Join us on Thursday, July 10 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wi_3gB6qpGo) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

This program is presented in partnership with the National Capital Planning Commission and will function as the informal kick-off for the official commemoration of the 150th anniversary of The Battle of Fort Stevens. 

Author Alan Rems discusses forgotten South Pacific battlegrounds such as Buna, the torpedo-infested waters off New Georgia, and the deadly skies over Rabaul and Wewak. Rems also looks at the major figures and fighting men on both sides of the South Pacific campaigns. 
Join us on Tuesday, July 8 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeK2pz3ofOM) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing follows the program.

Author Alan Rems discusses forgotten South Pacific battlegrounds such as Buna, the torpedo-infested waters off New Georgia, and the deadly skies over Rabaul and Wewak. Rems also looks at the major figures and fighting men on both sides of the South Pacific campaigns.

Join us on Tuesday, July 8 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeK2pz3ofOM) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing follows the program.

Despite Hurricane Arthur, the weather was beautiful in Washington, DC as we celebrated the Fourth of July at the National Archives! The day started with the signing of the Declaration of Independence, followed by the Declaration of Independence Reading Ceremony on the steps of the National Archives. 

We kicked off the day with the first #ColonialSelfie featuring the Archivist of the United States, David S. Ferriero, Thomas Jefferson, Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Linda Watters from sponsor John Hancock USA, and other founding fathers. 

Wishing everyone a happy and safe Independence Day!

todaysdocument:

Headed to #ArchivesJuly4?  Share your #ColonialSelfie with usnatarchives!
Snap a picture with a Founding Father or be creative; your #ColonialSelfie can be with anything that was in fashion in 1776! Use the #ColonialSelfie hashtag, and share it with @USNatArchives on twitter!

More about July 4 at the National Archives


Colonial Selfies, Instagram Bingo & more #ArchviesJuly4 activities on Social Media

todaysdocument:

Headed to #ArchivesJuly4?  Share your #ColonialSelfie with usnatarchives!

Snap a picture with a Founding Father or be creative; your #ColonialSelfie can be with anything that was in fashion in 1776! 

Use the #ColonialSelfie hashtag, and share it with @USNatArchives on twitter!

preservearchives:

Kitty Nicholson, retired Supervisory Conservator at the National Archives, shares a mystery about the Declaration of Independence in an exclusive video on the National Archives YouTube Channel. 

Watch the following video—if you can help solve the mystery, you may become a legend!

Happy Independence Day!

Join the Fourth of July at the National Archives celebration by playing Instagram Bingo! 
As you’re out enjoying parades, picnics, and cookouts, see if you can find 9 of our Fourth of July themed scenes. Once you have 9, create a collage and post to Instagram with the #BINGO AND #ArchivesJuly4 hashtags and your photo will be shared by the National Archives! 
You don’t have to be with us in Washington, DC to participate; we can’t wait to see how everyone celebrates America’s Birthday across the country. 
Themes include: an American flag, parade balloons, a Revolutionary War uniform, color guard, fife and drums, Thomas Jefferson, a red wagon, a patriotic pet, the Declaration of Independence, a National Archives temporary tattoo, a marching band, a fire truck, Uncle Sam, parade dancers, stars and/or stripes, red, white, and/or blue. 
Visit the Fourth of July page on our website for a list of all the activities at the National Archives on July 4th. 

Join the Fourth of July at the National Archives celebration by playing Instagram Bingo!

As you’re out enjoying parades, picnics, and cookouts, see if you can find 9 of our Fourth of July themed scenes. Once you have 9, create a collage and post to Instagram with the #BINGO AND #ArchivesJuly4 hashtags and your photo will be shared by the National Archives!

You don’t have to be with us in Washington, DC to participate; we can’t wait to see how everyone celebrates America’s Birthday across the country.

Themes include: an American flag, parade balloons, a Revolutionary War uniform, color guard, fife and drums, Thomas Jefferson, a red wagon, a patriotic pet, the Declaration of Independence, a National Archives temporary tattoo, a marching band, a fire truck, Uncle Sam, parade dancers, stars and/or stripes, red, white, and/or blue. 

Visit the Fourth of July page on our website for a list of all the activities at the National Archives on July 4th. 

Spending the Fourth of July with us? Inspired by a certain celebrity group shot at the Oscars, we invite you to post a #ColonialSelfie on Twitter! 

While out enjoying your Fourth of July, snap a picture with a Founding Father and show us on Twitter. If you don’t run into Thomas Jefferson or Benjamin Franklin, be creative; your #ColonialSelfie can be with anything that was in fashion in 1776! 

Don’t forget to use the #ColonialSelfie hashtag, and send it to us on Twitter at @USNatArchives.

To find out more about July 4 at the National Archives

todaysdocument:

On July 2, 1964, with Martin Luther King, Jr., directly behind him, President Lyndon Johnson scrawled his signature on a document years in the making—the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark legislation.

Civil Rights Act of 1964 , 07/02/1964

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King, Jr., others look on, 07/02/1964. (The Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library)

The first and the signature pages of the act will be on display at the National Archives Rubenstein Gallery in Washington, DC, until September 17, 2014. These 50-year-old sheets of paper represent years of struggle and society’s journey toward justice.

The most comprehensive civil rights legislation since the Reconstruction era, the Civil Right Act finally gave the Federal Government the means to enforce the promises of the 13th,  14th, and 15th Amendments. The act prohibited discrimination in public places, allowed the integration of public facilities and schools, and forbade discrimination in employment.

But such a landmark congressional enactment was by no means achieved easily…

Keep reading at Prologue: Pieces of History » Now On Display: The Civil Rights Act of 1964

Plus more on the Civil Rights Act of 1964: