Kidnapping the Enemy: The Special Operations to Capture Generals Charles Lee and Richard Prescott
When British dragoons kidnapped Major General Charles Lee, the second-in-command in the Continental Army, they were confident the rebellion would soon be over. But stung by Lee’s kidnapping, the Americans decided to respond with their own special operation. Author Christian McBurney discusses this and other attempts to kidnap high-ranking military officers and government officials during the Revolutionary War. 
Join us on Wednesday, July 16 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuHjgtXIqFA) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing will follow.

Kidnapping the Enemy: The Special Operations to Capture Generals Charles Lee and Richard Prescott

When British dragoons kidnapped Major General Charles Lee, the second-in-command in the Continental Army, they were confident the rebellion would soon be over. But stung by Lee’s kidnapping, the Americans decided to respond with their own special operation. Author Christian McBurney discusses this and other attempts to kidnap high-ranking military officers and government officials during the Revolutionary War.

Join us on Wednesday, July 16 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuHjgtXIqFA) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing will follow.

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The Wonder Sponge: And We are Not Talking about SpongeBob SquarePants

A popular tool in our St. Louis Paper Lab for cleaning mold from records is our foamed natural rubber sponge erasers. Every work station has a pile of them! These soft erasers do wonders in cleaning mold from the paper’s surface. The erasers come in “brick” sizes and are easily trimmed down into smaller pieces which are held more easily in your hand. But an important word of caution! Although softer than hard erasers these can still be abrasive, and can cause damage if used on paper surfaces that are soft and friable due to more extensive damage.

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Feeling adventurous? Sign up for the Sleepover at the National Archives on August 2 and explore some of history’s most exciting frontiers!

This summer’s sleepover theme is “Explorers Night,” allowing campers to journey to the Arctic, visit Outer Space, and discover the American West as they explore the National Archives Museum in a unique after-hours experience. Young explorers can chat with famous pioneers like Meriwether Lewis and Louise Arner Boyd and learn about life as an astronaut through artifacts straight from the National Air and Space Museum (like the “space toilet” and “living and working in space” discovery stations)!

Guests will be treated to movies in the museum’s William G. McGowan Theater before turning in for the night, and will enjoy a pancake breakfast flipped by our very own Archivist of the United States, David S. Ferriero in the morning. 

Tickets are $125 per participant or $100 for Foundation members, NARA employees, and contractors. To register for the Sleepover at the National Archives. Learn more.

We hope to see you at the sleepover—and don’t forget to bring your sense of adventure!

This program is presented by the National Archives Education Department with Congressional funding. It is supported in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generosity of John Hancock.

Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns
Join us for Episode Seven: Dedicated to Chaos. During World War II, swing became a symbol of democracy at home. Bandleaders enlisted and took their music to the armed forces overseas. The new style of “bebop” began to spread, altering the course of jazz forever. (120 minutes.)
Friday, July 11 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns

Join us for Episode Seven: Dedicated to ChaosDuring World War II, swing became a symbol of democracy at home. Bandleaders enlisted and took their music to the armed forces overseas. The new style of “bebop” began to spread, altering the course of jazz forever. (120 minutes.)

Friday, July 11 at noon in the William McGowan Theater (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Constitution-in-Action Learning Lab Family Program
Families act as researchers and archivists during a two-hour simulation as they help the President and his communications director prepare for a press conference by locating and analyzing facsimile documents to find the connection to the Constitution. This is a great way to explore history, learn about the National Archives, and understand the role the Constitution plays in our daily lives.
Join us on Thursday, July 10 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2:00-4:00 p.m. in the Boeing Learning Center. Reservations are required at least 24 hours in advance. Email learninglab@nara.gov with date and time, names of adults and children, phone number, and mailing address.

Constitution-in-Action Learning Lab Family Program

Families act as researchers and archivists during a two-hour simulation as they help the President and his communications director prepare for a press conference by locating and analyzing facsimile documents to find the connection to the Constitution. This is a great way to explore history, learn about the National Archives, and understand the role the Constitution plays in our daily lives.

Join us on Thursday, July 10 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2:00-4:00 p.m. in the Boeing Learning CenterReservations are required at least 24 hours in advance. Email learninglab@nara.gov with date and time, names of adults and children, phone number, and mailing address.

Washington’s Civil War Forts and Parks
During the Civil War, the Union army constructed a series of earthen defenses in and around Washington to protect the nation’s capital from attack. The defeat of Confederate forces at one of these―Fort Stevens―helped keep Washington in Union control. Dr. B. Franklin Cooling, historian, author, and Professor of History, National Defense University, Loretta Neumann, Vice President, Alliance to Preserve the Civil War Defenses of Washington, and Kym Elder, Program Manager, Civil War Defenses of Washington, National Park Service, will discuss the development of Washington’s Civil War forts, their role in the war, and their ensuing transformation into the public parks and cultural resources known as the Fort Circle Parks. 
Join us on Thursday, July 10 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wi_3gB6qpGo) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
This program is presented in partnership with the National Capital Planning Commission and will function as the informal kick-off for the official commemoration of the 150th anniversary of The Battle of Fort Stevens. 

Washington’s Civil War Forts and Parks

During the Civil War, the Union army constructed a series of earthen defenses in and around Washington to protect the nation’s capital from attack. The defeat of Confederate forces at one of these―Fort Stevens―helped keep Washington in Union control. Dr. B. Franklin Cooling, historian, author, and Professor of History, National Defense University, Loretta Neumann, Vice President, Alliance to Preserve the Civil War Defenses of Washington, and Kym Elder, Program Manager, Civil War Defenses of Washington, National Park Service, will discuss the development of Washington’s Civil War forts, their role in the war, and their ensuing transformation into the public parks and cultural resources known as the Fort Circle Parks.

Join us on Thursday, July 10 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wi_3gB6qpGo) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

This program is presented in partnership with the National Capital Planning Commission and will function as the informal kick-off for the official commemoration of the 150th anniversary of The Battle of Fort Stevens. 

Author Alan Rems discusses forgotten South Pacific battlegrounds such as Buna, the torpedo-infested waters off New Georgia, and the deadly skies over Rabaul and Wewak. Rems also looks at the major figures and fighting men on both sides of the South Pacific campaigns. 
Join us on Tuesday, July 8 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeK2pz3ofOM) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing follows the program.

Author Alan Rems discusses forgotten South Pacific battlegrounds such as Buna, the torpedo-infested waters off New Georgia, and the deadly skies over Rabaul and Wewak. Rems also looks at the major figures and fighting men on both sides of the South Pacific campaigns.

Join us on Tuesday, July 8 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeK2pz3ofOM) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing follows the program.

Despite Hurricane Arthur, the weather was beautiful in Washington, DC as we celebrated the Fourth of July at the National Archives! The day started with the signing of the Declaration of Independence, followed by the Declaration of Independence Reading Ceremony on the steps of the National Archives. 

We kicked off the day with the first #ColonialSelfie featuring the Archivist of the United States, David S. Ferriero, Thomas Jefferson, Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Linda Watters from sponsor John Hancock USA, and other founding fathers. 

Wishing everyone a happy and safe Independence Day!

todaysdocument:

Headed to #ArchivesJuly4?  Share your #ColonialSelfie with usnatarchives!
Snap a picture with a Founding Father or be creative; your #ColonialSelfie can be with anything that was in fashion in 1776! Use the #ColonialSelfie hashtag, and share it with @USNatArchives on twitter!

More about July 4 at the National Archives


Colonial Selfies, Instagram Bingo & more #ArchviesJuly4 activities on Social Media

todaysdocument:

Headed to #ArchivesJuly4?  Share your #ColonialSelfie with usnatarchives!

Snap a picture with a Founding Father or be creative; your #ColonialSelfie can be with anything that was in fashion in 1776! 

Use the #ColonialSelfie hashtag, and share it with @USNatArchives on twitter!

preservearchives:

Kitty Nicholson, retired Supervisory Conservator at the National Archives, shares a mystery about the Declaration of Independence in an exclusive video on the National Archives YouTube Channel. 

Watch the following video—if you can help solve the mystery, you may become a legend!

Happy Independence Day!