Congress established the Works Progress Administration, a central part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” on April 8, 1935.
The WPA employed more than 8.5 million persons on 1.4 million public projects before it was disbanded in 1943. The Federal Theatre Project was one of the five Federal One projects sponsored by the Works Progress Administration. The Federal One projects included: the Federal Writers’ Project, the Historical Records Survey, the Federal Theatre Project, Federal Music Project, and the Federal Art Project. The Federal Theatre Project employed out-of-work artists, writers, and directors to entertain poor families and create relevant art. 
This image is from a play produced by the Federal Theater Project entitled “It Can’t Happen Here” in 1935 in New York City. Image: National Archives Identifier 195735. 

Congress established the Works Progress Administration, a central part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” on April 8, 1935.

The WPA employed more than 8.5 million persons on 1.4 million public projects before it was disbanded in 1943. The Federal Theatre Project was one of the five Federal One projects sponsored by the Works Progress Administration. The Federal One projects included: the Federal Writers’ Project, the Historical Records Survey, the Federal Theatre Project, Federal Music Project, and the Federal Art Project. The Federal Theatre Project employed out-of-work artists, writers, and directors to entertain poor families and create relevant art. 

This image is from a play produced by the Federal Theater Project entitled “It Can’t Happen Here” in 1935 in New York City. Image: National Archives Identifier 195735. 

Our own Archivist of the United States, David S. Ferriero, will introduce President Carter tonight at the Civil Rights Summit in Austin, Texas.

In honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library is hosting the summit on April 8, 9, and 10.

You can watch the panel discussions and keynote address live on their website: http://www.civilrightssummit.org/updates/

The keynote speakers include President Barack Obama and three former Presidents: Jimmy Carter will speak on April 8; Bill Clinton will speak on April 9; and George W. Bush will speak on the evening of April 10.

Learn more about the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in our new Google Cultural Institute exhibit, which includes videos, letters, telegrams, meeting minutes, and high resolution photos. 

Image: LBJ signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Serial Number: A1030-17a Date: 08/06/1965. Credit: LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto.

Archivist specialist Nancy Wing offers genealogists tips on how to navigate Archives.gov. 
Wednesday, April 9, at 9:30 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 
Image: Haskell County, Kansas. This is one of the best situated families in the county, National Archives Identifier 522159.

Archivist specialist Nancy Wing offers genealogists tips on how to navigate Archives.gov. 

Wednesday, April 9, at 9:30 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 

Image: Haskell County, Kansas. This is one of the best situated families in the county, National Archives Identifier 522159.

The Archivist of the United States crossed Pennsylvania Avenue yesterday to “ring” in the opening of the farmer’s market on 8th Street in Penn Quarter. (He brought his own bell!)

The National Archives building is built on the site of the old DC Central Market, so it was an appropriate intersection of past and current history.

Along with a crowd of chefs, foodies, and other VIPs, the Archivist marched through the market. He was joined by chef Jose Andres, wrote the foreword to our 2011 exhibit catalog for "What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?" and the introduction to the recipe book "Eating with Uncle Sam."

Author Harvey Kaye discusses his book and the “greatest generation” on Monday, April 7, at noon.
Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person in the National Archives Building (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
The “four freedoms” were the democratic aims–freedom from want and fear, freedom of speech and religion–that helped beat the Great Depression, defeat the Axis Powers in World War II, and turn the United States into the strongest and richest nation in history. They remain the most significant legacy of America’s most progressive generation.
Professor Harvey Kaye recalls the full story of this generation’s extraordinary stuggles and accomplishments.
A book signing will follow the program.

Author Harvey Kaye discusses his book and the “greatest generation” on Monday, April 7, at noon.

Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person in the National Archives Building (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

The “four freedoms” were the democratic aims–freedom from want and fear, freedom of speech and religion–that helped beat the Great Depression, defeat the Axis Powers in World War II, and turn the United States into the strongest and richest nation in history. They remain the most significant legacy of America’s most progressive generation.

Professor Harvey Kaye recalls the full story of this generation’s extraordinary stuggles and accomplishments.

A book signing will follow the program.

"The real treasures [of the National Archives] go home at night."

(Aw, shucks!!!)

David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, gives a shoutout to the staff of the National Archives in his kickoff to the #ArchivesFair. (via archivesofamericanart)

(via riversidearchives)

Some cool facts from our Archives Fair today!
archivesofamericanart:

The numbers do not lie! NARA’s Meredith Stewart shows how crowdsourcing and social media sites have broadened access to NARA content.

Some cool facts from our Archives Fair today!

archivesofamericanart:

The numbers do not lie! NARA’s Meredith Stewart shows how crowdsourcing and social media sites have broadened access to NARA content.

We still use these carts in the National Archives, but they are perfect for #ThrowbackThursday!
In 1946, archivist Helen Beach got fed with trying to manage double-shelved records on the carts that she used. So she came up with her own design. In 1948, the carpentry shop made some suggestions, a prototype was created, and staff tried out the “Beach Wagon.”
It was a success! Assistant Archivist Robert H. Bahmer even approved a $25 cash award for her idea.


Mrs. Beach’s “wagons” are still useful—and still being used in the stacks today!

Read more about her innovative cart.

We still use these carts in the National Archives, but they are perfect for #ThrowbackThursday!

In 1946, archivist Helen Beach got fed with trying to manage double-shelved records on the carts that she used. So she came up with her own design. In 1948, the carpentry shop made some suggestions, a prototype was created, and staff tried out the “Beach Wagon.”

It was a success! Assistant Archivist Robert H. Bahmer even approved a $25 cash award for her idea.
Mrs. Beach’s “wagons” are still useful—and still being used in the stacks today!
Lee’s surrender to Grant at Appomattox Court House evokes a popular image of a moment of patriotism untainted by ideology. But Elizabeth Varon reveals that this rosy image conceals a seething debate over what the surrender meant and what kind of nation would emerge from war. Lee and Grant held opposite views of the direction of the country–and of the meaning of the war that had changed the country forever.
Join us on Friday, April 4, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing will follow the program.

Lee’s surrender to Grant at Appomattox Court House evokes a popular image of a moment of patriotism untainted by ideology. But Elizabeth Varon reveals that this rosy image conceals a seething debate over what the surrender meant and what kind of nation would emerge from war. Lee and Grant held opposite views of the direction of the country–and of the meaning of the war that had changed the country forever.

Join us on Friday, April 4, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing will follow the program.

See the journal page that records the election of George Washington of Virginia, now on display from April 1 to 16, 2014, in the National Archives Building.

This year marks the 225th anniversary of the First Congress. On March 4, 1789, the Congress of the United States met for the first time. It was arguably the most important Congress in U.S. history.

To this new legislature fell the responsibility of passing laws needed to implement a brand new system of government, defining the rules and procedures of the House and Senate, and establishing the precedents that set constitutional government in motion.

One of the first duties of the new legislative body was to meet jointly and count the electoral ballots for President and Vice President of the United States. This page of the first Senate Journal shows the results of that election: George Washington of Virginia was unanimously elected President, and John Adams of Massachusetts, who finished second in the balloting, was elected Vice President.

Image: Senate Journal of the First Congress, First Session, showing entry for April 6, 1789. National Archives, Records of the U.S. Senate