Increase your archival research skills at the National Archives with a genealogy lecture by archivist Claire Kluskens on immigration records (all skill levels welcome).
Saturday, April 26, at 10 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 
Image:Photograph of Immigrants on a Ferry Boat Near Ellis Island. National Archives Identifier 594479.

Increase your archival research skills at the National Archives with a genealogy lecture by archivist Claire Kluskens on immigration records (all skill levels welcome).

Saturday, April 26, at 10 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 

Image:Photograph of Immigrants on a Ferry Boat Near Ellis Island. National Archives Identifier 594479.

This 1994 documentary highlights a remarkable moment in the history of American music when dozens of America’s jazz legends unexpectedly gathered together for a photograph that would become emblematic of the golden age of jazz. (60 minutes.) 
Join us Friday 25 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.
Photo by Art Kane, 1958. Courtesy of Jean Bach, Inc.

This 1994 documentary highlights a remarkable moment in the history of American music when dozens of America’s jazz legends unexpectedly gathered together for a photograph that would become emblematic of the golden age of jazz. (60 minutes.) 

Join us Friday 25 at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Photo by Art Kane, 1958. Courtesy of Jean Bach, Inc.

Beginning in the 1950s, the U.S. Government used jazz as a diplomatic tool during the Cold War. John Edward Hasse—author, curator, biographer of Duke Ellington and founder of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra—leads a discussion focusing on efforts by the United States Information Agency, the Voice of America, and the U.S. Department of State. Panelists include Former Ambassador David T. Killion, who organized International Jazz Day for UNESCO; David Ensor, current Director of the Voice of America; and historian Penny Von Eschen, author of Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War.
Join us on Thursday, April 24, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
This is the first in a series of programs, Jazz at the National Archives, made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Beginning in the 1950s, the U.S. Government used jazz as a diplomatic tool during the Cold War. John Edward Hasse—author, curator, biographer of Duke Ellington and founder of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra—leads a discussion focusing on efforts by the United States Information Agency, the Voice of America, and the U.S. Department of State. Panelists include Former Ambassador David T. Killion, who organized International Jazz Day for UNESCO; David Ensor, current Director of the Voice of America; and historian Penny Von Eschen, author of Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War.

Join us on Thursday, April 24, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

This is the first in a series of programs, Jazz at the National Archives, made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

General Douglas MacArthur–imperious, headstrong, and vain–is also remembered as a brilliant commander. Mark Perry examines how this paradoxical man overcame his personal and professional challenges to lead his countrymen in World War II.
Join us on Wednesday, April 23, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing will follow the program

General Douglas MacArthur–imperious, headstrong, and vain–is also remembered as a brilliant commander. Mark Perry examines how this paradoxical man overcame his personal and professional challenges to lead his countrymen in World War II.

Join us on Wednesday, April 23, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing will follow the program

Monday will be an eggs-ellent day in Washington, DC, for young people! It’s the annual White House Easter Egg Roll, where hundreds of children gather to roll eggs and play games on the South Lawn of the President’s House.
But the tradition did not start at the White House. It began on the lawns and terraces of the Capitol after the Civil War. Children of all races and backgrounds rolled eggs and played games on the turf around the Capitol.
But in 1878, children who arrived at the Capitol on Easter Monday were turned away.
Congress had passed a law to prevent these young citizens from taking such liberties on the grounds, and it became the “duty of the Capitol police hereafter to prevent any portion of the Capitol grounds and terraces from being used as playgrounds or otherwise.”
It’s not clear how the party was rolled over to the White House, but a newspaper clipping in Rutherford B. Hayes’s personal scrapbook shows he was the first President to officially allow the Executive Mansion to be used for egg rolling. (There were informal egg rollings there as early as Lincoln’s administration.)
The good times and egg rolling continued through the following Presidential administrations with a few brief interruptions. In 1917, during World War I, the egg roll was canceled until 1920 because of concerns of the waste of food.
War took a toll again in 1946, when Harry Truman discouraged the egg roll in the face of the millions left devasted and starving by World War II. The egg roll did not return until President Eisenhower revived it in 1953.
It’s been rolling along ever since! Here’s some fun facts from our favorite egg-centric Prologue article:
In 1933, Eleanor introduced organized games and greeted the public by radio on a nationwide hookup.
In 1969, Pat Nixon’s staff introduced the White House Easter Bunny
In 1974, organized egg-rolling races were introduced.
In 1981, First Lady Nancy Reagan presided over the festivities. As a little girl, she had attended President Coolidge’s egg roll.
In 1998, Bill and Hillary Clinton welcomed the world’s children—live—over the Internet.
Image: In 1958 Bunny, Hazel, Fred (Skippy), and Darlene Johansen attend the Eisenhowers’ White House Easter Egg Roll. (Eisenhower Library)

Monday will be an eggs-ellent day in Washington, DC, for young people! It’s the annual White House Easter Egg Roll, where hundreds of children gather to roll eggs and play games on the South Lawn of the President’s House.

But the tradition did not start at the White House. It began on the lawns and terraces of the Capitol after the Civil War. Children of all races and backgrounds rolled eggs and played games on the turf around the Capitol.

But in 1878, children who arrived at the Capitol on Easter Monday were turned away.

Congress had passed a law to prevent these young citizens from taking such liberties on the grounds, and it became the “duty of the Capitol police hereafter to prevent any portion of the Capitol grounds and terraces from being used as playgrounds or otherwise.”

It’s not clear how the party was rolled over to the White House, but a newspaper clipping in Rutherford B. Hayes’s personal scrapbook shows he was the first President to officially allow the Executive Mansion to be used for egg rolling. (There were informal egg rollings there as early as Lincoln’s administration.)

The good times and egg rolling continued through the following Presidential administrations with a few brief interruptions. In 1917, during World War I, the egg roll was canceled until 1920 because of concerns of the waste of food.

War took a toll again in 1946, when Harry Truman discouraged the egg roll in the face of the millions left devasted and starving by World War II. The egg roll did not return until President Eisenhower revived it in 1953.

It’s been rolling along ever since! Here’s some fun facts from our favorite egg-centric Prologue article:

In 1933, Eleanor introduced organized games and greeted the public by radio on a nationwide hookup.

In 1969, Pat Nixon’s staff introduced the White House Easter Bunny

In 1974, organized egg-rolling races were introduced.

In 1981, First Lady Nancy Reagan presided over the festivities. As a little girl, she had attended President Coolidge’s egg roll.

In 1998, Bill and Hillary Clinton welcomed the world’s children—live—over the Internet.

Image: In 1958 Bunny, Hazel, Fred (Skippy), and Darlene Johansen attend the Eisenhowers’ White House Easter Egg Roll. (Eisenhower Library)

The Harlem Rattlers held near–mythic status. The African American combat unit that grew out of the 15th New York National Guard were said to never have lost either a man to capture nor a foot of ground that had been taken. Author Jeffrey Sammons discusses the history of this extraordinary unit and its place in the larger fight for full citizenship in the United States for African Americans. 
Join us on Friday, April 18, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing will follow the program.

The Harlem Rattlers held near–mythic status. The African American combat unit that grew out of the 15th New York National Guard were said to never have lost either a man to capture nor a foot of ground that had been taken. Author Jeffrey Sammons discusses the history of this extraordinary unit and its place in the larger fight for full citizenship in the United States for African Americans.

Join us on Friday, April 18, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing will follow the program.

Happy National Libraries Week! Did you know that David S. Ferriero, who is the head of the National Archives, is actually a librarian?

But before he became the tenth Archivist of the United States, “Dave Ferriero” was a boy who wrote to President Eisenhower and requested an autographed photograph. The letter was saved in the holdings of Eisenhower Presidential Library!

The Archivist’s letter to President Eisenhower is currently on display in our exhibit "Making their Mark: Stories Through Signatures."

You can read more about the Archivist’s career on our website.

Letter and autographed photograph from the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum

Using Federal records from 1890-1930, archivist Damani Davis discusses how to locate immigrant ancestors from the West Indies. 
Thursday, April 17, at 11 a.m. at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room C.
Image:Ellis Island, New York, ca. 1910 National Archives Identifier 6235189. 

Using Federal records from 1890-1930, archivist Damani Davis discusses how to locate immigrant ancestors from the West Indies. 

Thursday, April 17, at 11 a.m. at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room C.

Image:Ellis Island, New York, ca. 1910 National Archives Identifier 6235189. 

This Thursday, on the 40th anniversary of Home Rule and the 152nd anniversary of the District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act, a panel will discuss the symbiotic relationship between the struggle for emancipation and the struggle for home rule, congressional representation, and statehood. John Franklin of the National Museum of African American History and Culture moderates panelists Virginia Howard, professor of education at the University of the District of Columbia; Jerome Paige, economist; Miles Mark Fisher, former President of University of the District of Columbia; Sharon Pratt, former Mayor of the District of Columbia; and Tom Davis, former Congressman. 
Join us Thursday, April 17, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Presented in partnership with the DC City Government and the NMAAHC.

This Thursday, on the 40th anniversary of Home Rule and the 152nd anniversary of the District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act, a panel will discuss the symbiotic relationship between the struggle for emancipation and the struggle for home rule, congressional representation, and statehood. John Franklin of the National Museum of African American History and Culture moderates panelists Virginia Howard, professor of education at the University of the District of Columbia; Jerome Paige, economist; Miles Mark Fisher, former President of University of the District of Columbia; Sharon Pratt, former Mayor of the District of Columbia; and Tom Davis, former Congressman.

Join us Thursday, April 17, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Presented in partnership with the DC City Government and the NMAAHC.

Increase your archival research skills at the National Archives with a genealogy lecture by archives specialist Katherine Vollen on nonpopulation census records (all skill levels welcome). 
Wednesday, April 16, at 11 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 
Image: Occupational Coder, Average Daily Production of a Trained Clerk was 1,886 Lines, and the Highest Record was 6,000 Lines, 1940 - 1941. National Archives Identifier 6200848.

Increase your archival research skills at the National Archives with a genealogy lecture by archives specialist Katherine Vollen on nonpopulation census records (all skill levels welcome). 

Wednesday, April 16, at 11 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 

Image: Occupational Coder, Average Daily Production of a Trained Clerk was 1,886 Lines, and the Highest Record was 6,000 Lines, 1940 - 1941. National Archives Identifier 6200848.