The Harlem Rattlers held near–mythic status. The African American combat unit that grew out of the 15th New York National Guard were said to never have lost either a man to capture nor a foot of ground that had been taken. Author Jeffrey Sammons discusses the history of this extraordinary unit and its place in the larger fight for full citizenship in the United States for African Americans. 
Join us on Friday, April 18, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing will follow the program.

The Harlem Rattlers held near–mythic status. The African American combat unit that grew out of the 15th New York National Guard were said to never have lost either a man to capture nor a foot of ground that had been taken. Author Jeffrey Sammons discusses the history of this extraordinary unit and its place in the larger fight for full citizenship in the United States for African Americans.

Join us on Friday, April 18, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing will follow the program.

Happy National Libraries Week! Did you know that David S. Ferriero, who is the head of the National Archives, is actually a librarian?

But before he became the tenth Archivist of the United States, “Dave Ferriero” was a boy who wrote to President Eisenhower and requested an autographed photograph. The letter was saved in the holdings of Eisenhower Presidential Library!

The Archivist’s letter to President Eisenhower is currently on display in our exhibit "Making their Mark: Stories Through Signatures."

You can read more about the Archivist’s career on our website.

Letter and autographed photograph from the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum

Using Federal records from 1890-1930, archivist Damani Davis discusses how to locate immigrant ancestors from the West Indies. 
Thursday, April 17, at 11 a.m. at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room C.
Image:Ellis Island, New York, ca. 1910 National Archives Identifier 6235189. 

Using Federal records from 1890-1930, archivist Damani Davis discusses how to locate immigrant ancestors from the West Indies. 

Thursday, April 17, at 11 a.m. at the National Archives at College Park, MD, Lecture Room C.

Image:Ellis Island, New York, ca. 1910 National Archives Identifier 6235189. 

This Thursday, on the 40th anniversary of Home Rule and the 152nd anniversary of the District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act, a panel will discuss the symbiotic relationship between the struggle for emancipation and the struggle for home rule, congressional representation, and statehood. John Franklin of the National Museum of African American History and Culture moderates panelists Virginia Howard, professor of education at the University of the District of Columbia; Jerome Paige, economist; Miles Mark Fisher, former President of University of the District of Columbia; Sharon Pratt, former Mayor of the District of Columbia; and Tom Davis, former Congressman. 
Join us Thursday, April 17, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Presented in partnership with the DC City Government and the NMAAHC.

This Thursday, on the 40th anniversary of Home Rule and the 152nd anniversary of the District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act, a panel will discuss the symbiotic relationship between the struggle for emancipation and the struggle for home rule, congressional representation, and statehood. John Franklin of the National Museum of African American History and Culture moderates panelists Virginia Howard, professor of education at the University of the District of Columbia; Jerome Paige, economist; Miles Mark Fisher, former President of University of the District of Columbia; Sharon Pratt, former Mayor of the District of Columbia; and Tom Davis, former Congressman.

Join us Thursday, April 17, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Presented in partnership with the DC City Government and the NMAAHC.

Increase your archival research skills at the National Archives with a genealogy lecture by archives specialist Katherine Vollen on nonpopulation census records (all skill levels welcome). 
Wednesday, April 16, at 11 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 
Image: Occupational Coder, Average Daily Production of a Trained Clerk was 1,886 Lines, and the Highest Record was 6,000 Lines, 1940 - 1941. National Archives Identifier 6200848.

Increase your archival research skills at the National Archives with a genealogy lecture by archives specialist Katherine Vollen on nonpopulation census records (all skill levels welcome). 

Wednesday, April 16, at 11 a.m. in Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance). 

Image: Occupational Coder, Average Daily Production of a Trained Clerk was 1,886 Lines, and the Highest Record was 6,000 Lines, 1940 - 1941. National Archives Identifier 6200848.

Journalists Todd Purdum and Cokie Roberts discuss the political battles behind the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the popular myths about this monumental piece of legislation as well as the patient organization, unending advocacy, and across–the–aisle teamwork that created  H.R. 7152.Purdum recreates the cast of characters–many now forgotten–who were the catalysts for change. 
Join us on Tuesday, April 15, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing will follow the program.

Journalists Todd Purdum and Cokie Roberts discuss the political battles behind the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the popular myths about this monumental piece of legislation as well as the patient organization, unending advocacy, and across–the–aisle teamwork that created  H.R. 7152.Purdum recreates the cast of characters–many now forgotten–who were the catalysts for change.

Join us on Tuesday, April 15, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing will follow the program.

Spring has finally arrived in Washington, DC! And we must admit, the National Archives looks pretty in pink. 
Are you visiting for spring break?

Spring has finally arrived in Washington, DC! And we must admit, the National Archives looks pretty in pink. 

Are you visiting for spring break?

President Herbert Hoover composed and revised a previously unknown memoir during the 1940s and 1950s, and then set it aside. Editor George Nash discusses The Crusade Years, in which Hoover recounts his family life after March 1933, his myriad philanthropic interests, his political crusades, and his vision of the nation that gave him the opportunity for service. 
Join us on Tuesday, April 15, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
A book signing will follow the program.

President Herbert Hoover composed and revised a previously unknown memoir during the 1940s and 1950s, and then set it aside. Editor George Nash discusses The Crusade Years, in which Hoover recounts his family life after March 1933, his myriad philanthropic interests, his political crusades, and his vision of the nation that gave him the opportunity for service. 

Join us on Tuesday, April 15, at noon in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

A book signing will follow the program.

Masaaki Miyazawa’s new film “Umi Yama Ahida” uses breathtaking imagery to explain Japanese methods of environmental sustainability and protection of forests.The screening will be followed by a live performance by the AUN-J-Classic Orchestra, who provided music for the film.
Join us on Friday, April 11, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
Presented in partnership with the 2014 National Cherry Blossom Festival. Image Copyright Masaaki Miyazawa

Masaaki Miyazawa’s new film “Umi Yama Ahida” uses breathtaking imagery to explain Japanese methods of environmental sustainability and protection of forests.The screening will be followed by a live performance by the AUN-J-Classic Orchestra, who provided music for the film.

Join us on Friday, April 11, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

Presented in partnership with the 2014 National Cherry Blossom Festival. Image Copyright Masaaki Miyazawa

Congress established the Works Progress Administration, a central part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” on April 8, 1935.
The WPA employed more than 8.5 million persons on 1.4 million public projects before it was disbanded in 1943. The Federal Theatre Project was one of the five Federal One projects sponsored by the Works Progress Administration. The Federal One projects included: the Federal Writers’ Project, the Historical Records Survey, the Federal Theatre Project, Federal Music Project, and the Federal Art Project. The Federal Theatre Project employed out-of-work artists, writers, and directors to entertain poor families and create relevant art. 
This image is from a play produced by the Federal Theater Project entitled “It Can’t Happen Here” in 1935 in New York City. Image: National Archives Identifier 195735. 

Congress established the Works Progress Administration, a central part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” on April 8, 1935.

The WPA employed more than 8.5 million persons on 1.4 million public projects before it was disbanded in 1943. The Federal Theatre Project was one of the five Federal One projects sponsored by the Works Progress Administration. The Federal One projects included: the Federal Writers’ Project, the Historical Records Survey, the Federal Theatre Project, Federal Music Project, and the Federal Art Project. The Federal Theatre Project employed out-of-work artists, writers, and directors to entertain poor families and create relevant art. 

This image is from a play produced by the Federal Theater Project entitled “It Can’t Happen Here” in 1935 in New York City. Image: National Archives Identifier 195735.